Stress responses investigated; application of zinc and heat to Terrestrial Model Ecosystems from heavy metal polluted grassland.

S.A.E. Kools, M.P. Berg, M.E. Boivin, F.J.A. Kuenen, A.W.G. van der Wurff, C.A.M. van Gestel, N.M. van Straalen

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that soils with a deprived biodiversity due to metal pollution are less stable than non-polluted soils, containing a more diverse community. For this, soils were sampled from specific grasslands in the Netherlands that contain elevated heavy metal concentrations (Cu, Pb and Zn). Soils that showed the largest differences in metal concentrations were incubated in the laboratory using Terrestrial Model Ecosystems (TMEs). This approach enabled simultaneous measurement of structural (bacteria, nematodes, enchytraeids, earthworms) and functional parameters (nitrogen leaching, feeding activity, CO
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)462-468
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume406
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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