Teacher-evaluated self-regulation is related to school achievement and influenced by parental education in schoolchildren aged 8-12: A case-control study

Marleen A.J. van Tetering, Renate H.M. de Groot, Jelle Jolles

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

There are major inter-individual differences in the school achievements of students aged 8-12. The determinants of these differences are not known. This paper investigates two possible factors: the self-regulation of the student and the educational levels obtained by their parents. The study first investigates whether children with high and low academic achievement differ in their self-regulation. It then evaluates whether there are differences in the self-regulation of children with high and moderate-to-low level of parental education (LPE). The focus was on the self-regulation of students as judged by their teacher. Teacher evaluations were assessed using an observer questionnaire: the Amsterdam Executive Functioning Inventory. Results showed that students with low school achievement had substantially lower teacher-perceived self-regulation than children with high school achievement. Furthermore, teacher-perceived self-regulation was lower for children with moderate-to-low LPE than for children with high LPE. The findings suggest that interventions on the domain of self-regulation skills should be developed and used, particularly in students at risk of poor school achievement.

Original languageEnglish
Article number438
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume9
Issue numberApril
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Apr 2018

Fingerprint

Case-Control Studies
Education
Students
Self-Control
Individuality
Parents
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Early adolescence
  • Executive functions
  • Late childhood
  • Parental education
  • School achievement
  • Self-regulation

Cite this

@article{ec10d12e2ea9493eb3f1bd8e1629f3ef,
title = "Teacher-evaluated self-regulation is related to school achievement and influenced by parental education in schoolchildren aged 8-12: A case-control study",
abstract = "There are major inter-individual differences in the school achievements of students aged 8-12. The determinants of these differences are not known. This paper investigates two possible factors: the self-regulation of the student and the educational levels obtained by their parents. The study first investigates whether children with high and low academic achievement differ in their self-regulation. It then evaluates whether there are differences in the self-regulation of children with high and moderate-to-low level of parental education (LPE). The focus was on the self-regulation of students as judged by their teacher. Teacher evaluations were assessed using an observer questionnaire: the Amsterdam Executive Functioning Inventory. Results showed that students with low school achievement had substantially lower teacher-perceived self-regulation than children with high school achievement. Furthermore, teacher-perceived self-regulation was lower for children with moderate-to-low LPE than for children with high LPE. The findings suggest that interventions on the domain of self-regulation skills should be developed and used, particularly in students at risk of poor school achievement.",
keywords = "Early adolescence, Executive functions, Late childhood, Parental education, School achievement, Self-regulation",
author = "{van Tetering}, {Marleen A.J.} and {de Groot}, {Renate H.M.} and Jelle Jolles",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "4",
doi = "10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00438",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "1--12",
journal = "Frontiers in Psychology",
issn = "1664-1078",
publisher = "Frontiers Media",
number = "April",

}

Teacher-evaluated self-regulation is related to school achievement and influenced by parental education in schoolchildren aged 8-12 : A case-control study. / van Tetering, Marleen A.J.; de Groot, Renate H.M.; Jolles, Jelle.

In: Frontiers in Psychology, Vol. 9, No. April, 438, 04.04.2018, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Teacher-evaluated self-regulation is related to school achievement and influenced by parental education in schoolchildren aged 8-12

T2 - A case-control study

AU - van Tetering, Marleen A.J.

AU - de Groot, Renate H.M.

AU - Jolles, Jelle

PY - 2018/4/4

Y1 - 2018/4/4

N2 - There are major inter-individual differences in the school achievements of students aged 8-12. The determinants of these differences are not known. This paper investigates two possible factors: the self-regulation of the student and the educational levels obtained by their parents. The study first investigates whether children with high and low academic achievement differ in their self-regulation. It then evaluates whether there are differences in the self-regulation of children with high and moderate-to-low level of parental education (LPE). The focus was on the self-regulation of students as judged by their teacher. Teacher evaluations were assessed using an observer questionnaire: the Amsterdam Executive Functioning Inventory. Results showed that students with low school achievement had substantially lower teacher-perceived self-regulation than children with high school achievement. Furthermore, teacher-perceived self-regulation was lower for children with moderate-to-low LPE than for children with high LPE. The findings suggest that interventions on the domain of self-regulation skills should be developed and used, particularly in students at risk of poor school achievement.

AB - There are major inter-individual differences in the school achievements of students aged 8-12. The determinants of these differences are not known. This paper investigates two possible factors: the self-regulation of the student and the educational levels obtained by their parents. The study first investigates whether children with high and low academic achievement differ in their self-regulation. It then evaluates whether there are differences in the self-regulation of children with high and moderate-to-low level of parental education (LPE). The focus was on the self-regulation of students as judged by their teacher. Teacher evaluations were assessed using an observer questionnaire: the Amsterdam Executive Functioning Inventory. Results showed that students with low school achievement had substantially lower teacher-perceived self-regulation than children with high school achievement. Furthermore, teacher-perceived self-regulation was lower for children with moderate-to-low LPE than for children with high LPE. The findings suggest that interventions on the domain of self-regulation skills should be developed and used, particularly in students at risk of poor school achievement.

KW - Early adolescence

KW - Executive functions

KW - Late childhood

KW - Parental education

KW - School achievement

KW - Self-regulation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85045041069&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85045041069&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00438

DO - 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00438

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 1

EP - 12

JO - Frontiers in Psychology

JF - Frontiers in Psychology

SN - 1664-1078

IS - April

M1 - 438

ER -