Temporarily expanding the boundaries of the self: Motivations for entering the story world and implications for narrative effects.

M.D. Slater, B.K. Johnson, J. Cohen, M.L.G. Comello, D.R. Ewoldsen

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

A wide variety of motivations for engaging with narratives have been proposed and studied. We propose that underlying these motivations is another, more fundamental motivation. Our premise is that maintenance, defense, and regulation of the personal and social self in daily life are demanding both emotionally and cognitively. Moreover, any individual self is constrained by capability, situation, and social role. Stories and identification with story characters provide a means individuals may use for temporary relief from the task of self-regulation and from the limitations of individual personal and social identities. Existing supportive research is acknowledged and implications explored, concerning contexts in which story involvement will be particularly attractive and possible impacts on attitudes and acceptance of out-groups including stigmatized others. © 2014 International Communication Association.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-455
JournalJournal of Communication
Volume64
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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narrative
international communication
outgroup
Social Role
self-regulation
acceptance
regulation
Communication
Personal Identity
Relief
Fundamental
Daily Life
Self-regulation
Social Identity
Acceptance
International Communication

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Slater, M.D. ; Johnson, B.K. ; Cohen, J. ; Comello, M.L.G. ; Ewoldsen, D.R. / Temporarily expanding the boundaries of the self: Motivations for entering the story world and implications for narrative effects. In: Journal of Communication. 2014 ; Vol. 64, No. 3. pp. 439-455.
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Temporarily expanding the boundaries of the self: Motivations for entering the story world and implications for narrative effects. / Slater, M.D.; Johnson, B.K.; Cohen, J.; Comello, M.L.G.; Ewoldsen, D.R.

In: Journal of Communication, Vol. 64, No. 3, 2014, p. 439-455.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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