Tenure mix: apart or together? Homemaking practices and belonging in a Dutch street

Peer Smets, Karin Sneep

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This paper discusses home-making practices and senses of belonging in a street in a disadvantaged neighbourhood in the south of the Netherlands. The local tenure mix of tenants and owner-occupiers offers insight into the role class and ethnicity play in social mixing. Therefore, attention is paid to narratives and the informal organisation of different living spaces and territory-making practices. Here, the domestic space could be experienced as a vehicle of intimacy and sociability, or conversely as encouraging alienation. Such practices, in combination with length of stay result in mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion. The insights derived from this study will contribute to the theoretical discussion on home-making practices and belonging.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-106
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Housing and the Built Environment
Volume32
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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ethnicity
sociability
alienation
intimacy
Netherlands
exclusion
inclusion
narrative
living space

Cite this

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Tenure mix: apart or together? Homemaking practices and belonging in a Dutch street. / Smets, Peer; Sneep, Karin.

In: Journal of Housing and the Built Environment, Vol. 32, No. 1, 2017, p. 91-106.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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