Testing an alternative high-throughput tool for investigating bone diagenesis: FTIR in attenuated total reflection (ATR) mode

H.I. Hollund, F. Ariese, R. Fernandes, M.M.E. Jans, H. Kars

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Archaeological bone undergoes alterations after burial (diagenesis) that constitute a problem for the survival of archaeological information. A common method to assess this alteration is Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). However, the commonly applied method (FTIR-KBr) is destructive and sample preparation may influence the results. This paper tests the suitability of FTIR attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR), a method not commonly used to investigate bone diagenesis. FTIR-ATR requires less sample preparation and can be non-destructive, allowing analysis of bone cross-sections. Modern and archaeological bones were analysed using both methods and different sample preparation methods were tested. The results show that FTIR-ATR has advantages for the rapid assessment of bone diagenesis. © University of Oxford, 2012.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)507-532
JournalArchaeometry
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Testing
Bone Diagenesis
Infrared
Sample Preparation
Archaeological Bone
Alteration
Cross Section
Diagenesis
Non-destructive Analysis
Burial
Archaeology

Cite this

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abstract = "Archaeological bone undergoes alterations after burial (diagenesis) that constitute a problem for the survival of archaeological information. A common method to assess this alteration is Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). However, the commonly applied method (FTIR-KBr) is destructive and sample preparation may influence the results. This paper tests the suitability of FTIR attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR), a method not commonly used to investigate bone diagenesis. FTIR-ATR requires less sample preparation and can be non-destructive, allowing analysis of bone cross-sections. Modern and archaeological bones were analysed using both methods and different sample preparation methods were tested. The results show that FTIR-ATR has advantages for the rapid assessment of bone diagenesis. {\circledC} University of Oxford, 2012.",
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Testing an alternative high-throughput tool for investigating bone diagenesis: FTIR in attenuated total reflection (ATR) mode. / Hollund, H.I.; Ariese, F.; Fernandes, R.; Jans, M.M.E.; Kars, H.

In: Archaeometry, Vol. 55, No. 3, 2012, p. 507-532.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Testing an alternative high-throughput tool for investigating bone diagenesis: FTIR in attenuated total reflection (ATR) mode

AU - Hollund, H.I.

AU - Ariese, F.

AU - Fernandes, R.

AU - Jans, M.M.E.

AU - Kars, H.

PY - 2012

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AB - Archaeological bone undergoes alterations after burial (diagenesis) that constitute a problem for the survival of archaeological information. A common method to assess this alteration is Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). However, the commonly applied method (FTIR-KBr) is destructive and sample preparation may influence the results. This paper tests the suitability of FTIR attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR), a method not commonly used to investigate bone diagenesis. FTIR-ATR requires less sample preparation and can be non-destructive, allowing analysis of bone cross-sections. Modern and archaeological bones were analysed using both methods and different sample preparation methods were tested. The results show that FTIR-ATR has advantages for the rapid assessment of bone diagenesis. © University of Oxford, 2012.

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JO - Archaeometry

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