Testing familial transmission of smoking with two different research designs

Jorien L. Treur, Karin J.H. Verweij, Abdel Abdellaoui, Iryna O. Fedko, Eveline L. de Zeeuw, Erik A. Ehli, Gareth E. Davies, Jouke Jan Hottenga, Gonneke Willemsen, Dorret I. Boomsma, Jacqueline M. Vink

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Classical twin studies show that smoking is heritable. To determine if shared family environment plays a role in addition to genetic factors, and if they interact (G×E), we use a children- of-twins design. In a second sample, we measure genetic influence with polygenic risk scores (PRS) and environmental influence with a question on exposure to smoking during childhood. Methods: Data on smoking initiation were available for 723 children of 712 twins from the Netherlands Twin Register (64.9% female, median birth year 1985). Children were grouped in ascending order of risk, based on smoking status and zygosity of their twin-parent and his/her co-twin: never smoking twin-parent with a never smoking co-twin; never smoking twin-parent with a smoking dizygotic co-twin; never smoking twin-parent with a smoking monozygotic cotwin; and smoking twin-parent with a smoking or never smoking co-twin. For 4072 participants from the Netherlands Twin Register (67.3% female, median birth year 1973), PRS for smoking were computed and smoking initiation, smoking heaviness, and exposure to smoking during childhood were available. Results: Patterns of smoking initiation in the four group children-of-twins design suggested shared familial influences in addition to genetic factors. PRS for ever smoking were associated with smoking initiation in all individuals. PRS for smoking heaviness were associated with smoking heaviness in individuals exposed to smoking during childhood, but not in non-exposed individuals. Conclusions: Shared family environment influences smoking, over and above genetic factors. Genetic risk of smoking heaviness was only important for individuals exposed to smoking during childhood, versus those not exposed (G×E). Implications: This study adds to the very few existing children-of-twins (CoT) studies on smoking and combines a CoT design with a second research design that utilizes polygenic risk scores and data on exposure to smoking during childhood. The results show that shared family environment affects smoking behavior over and above genetic factors. There was also evidence for gene-environment interaction (G×E) such that genetic risk of heavy versus light smoking was only important for individuals who were also exposed to (second-hand) smoking during childhood. Together, these findings give additional incentive to recommending parents not to expose their children to cigarette smoking.

LanguageEnglish
Pages836-842
Number of pages7
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume20
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jun 2018

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Research Design
Smoking
Twin Studies
Netherlands
Parturition
Dizygotic Twins

Cite this

@article{a76ff3aab47940e28595723b94eacdde,
title = "Testing familial transmission of smoking with two different research designs",
abstract = "Introduction: Classical twin studies show that smoking is heritable. To determine if shared family environment plays a role in addition to genetic factors, and if they interact (G×E), we use a children- of-twins design. In a second sample, we measure genetic influence with polygenic risk scores (PRS) and environmental influence with a question on exposure to smoking during childhood. Methods: Data on smoking initiation were available for 723 children of 712 twins from the Netherlands Twin Register (64.9{\%} female, median birth year 1985). Children were grouped in ascending order of risk, based on smoking status and zygosity of their twin-parent and his/her co-twin: never smoking twin-parent with a never smoking co-twin; never smoking twin-parent with a smoking dizygotic co-twin; never smoking twin-parent with a smoking monozygotic cotwin; and smoking twin-parent with a smoking or never smoking co-twin. For 4072 participants from the Netherlands Twin Register (67.3{\%} female, median birth year 1973), PRS for smoking were computed and smoking initiation, smoking heaviness, and exposure to smoking during childhood were available. Results: Patterns of smoking initiation in the four group children-of-twins design suggested shared familial influences in addition to genetic factors. PRS for ever smoking were associated with smoking initiation in all individuals. PRS for smoking heaviness were associated with smoking heaviness in individuals exposed to smoking during childhood, but not in non-exposed individuals. Conclusions: Shared family environment influences smoking, over and above genetic factors. Genetic risk of smoking heaviness was only important for individuals exposed to smoking during childhood, versus those not exposed (G×E). Implications: This study adds to the very few existing children-of-twins (CoT) studies on smoking and combines a CoT design with a second research design that utilizes polygenic risk scores and data on exposure to smoking during childhood. The results show that shared family environment affects smoking behavior over and above genetic factors. There was also evidence for gene-environment interaction (G×E) such that genetic risk of heavy versus light smoking was only important for individuals who were also exposed to (second-hand) smoking during childhood. Together, these findings give additional incentive to recommending parents not to expose their children to cigarette smoking.",
author = "Treur, {Jorien L.} and Verweij, {Karin J.H.} and Abdel Abdellaoui and Fedko, {Iryna O.} and {de Zeeuw}, {Eveline L.} and Ehli, {Erik A.} and Davies, {Gareth E.} and Hottenga, {Jouke Jan} and Gonneke Willemsen and Boomsma, {Dorret I.} and Vink, {Jacqueline M.}",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1093/ntr/ntx121",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "836--842",
journal = "Nicotine and Tobacco Research",
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publisher = "Oxford University Press",
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}

Testing familial transmission of smoking with two different research designs. / Treur, Jorien L.; Verweij, Karin J.H.; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Fedko, Iryna O.; de Zeeuw, Eveline L.; Ehli, Erik A.; Davies, Gareth E.; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Vink, Jacqueline M.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 20, No. 7, 07.06.2018, p. 836-842.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Testing familial transmission of smoking with two different research designs

AU - Treur, Jorien L.

AU - Verweij, Karin J.H.

AU - Abdellaoui, Abdel

AU - Fedko, Iryna O.

AU - de Zeeuw, Eveline L.

AU - Ehli, Erik A.

AU - Davies, Gareth E.

AU - Hottenga, Jouke Jan

AU - Willemsen, Gonneke

AU - Boomsma, Dorret I.

AU - Vink, Jacqueline M.

PY - 2018/6/7

Y1 - 2018/6/7

N2 - Introduction: Classical twin studies show that smoking is heritable. To determine if shared family environment plays a role in addition to genetic factors, and if they interact (G×E), we use a children- of-twins design. In a second sample, we measure genetic influence with polygenic risk scores (PRS) and environmental influence with a question on exposure to smoking during childhood. Methods: Data on smoking initiation were available for 723 children of 712 twins from the Netherlands Twin Register (64.9% female, median birth year 1985). Children were grouped in ascending order of risk, based on smoking status and zygosity of their twin-parent and his/her co-twin: never smoking twin-parent with a never smoking co-twin; never smoking twin-parent with a smoking dizygotic co-twin; never smoking twin-parent with a smoking monozygotic cotwin; and smoking twin-parent with a smoking or never smoking co-twin. For 4072 participants from the Netherlands Twin Register (67.3% female, median birth year 1973), PRS for smoking were computed and smoking initiation, smoking heaviness, and exposure to smoking during childhood were available. Results: Patterns of smoking initiation in the four group children-of-twins design suggested shared familial influences in addition to genetic factors. PRS for ever smoking were associated with smoking initiation in all individuals. PRS for smoking heaviness were associated with smoking heaviness in individuals exposed to smoking during childhood, but not in non-exposed individuals. Conclusions: Shared family environment influences smoking, over and above genetic factors. Genetic risk of smoking heaviness was only important for individuals exposed to smoking during childhood, versus those not exposed (G×E). Implications: This study adds to the very few existing children-of-twins (CoT) studies on smoking and combines a CoT design with a second research design that utilizes polygenic risk scores and data on exposure to smoking during childhood. The results show that shared family environment affects smoking behavior over and above genetic factors. There was also evidence for gene-environment interaction (G×E) such that genetic risk of heavy versus light smoking was only important for individuals who were also exposed to (second-hand) smoking during childhood. Together, these findings give additional incentive to recommending parents not to expose their children to cigarette smoking.

AB - Introduction: Classical twin studies show that smoking is heritable. To determine if shared family environment plays a role in addition to genetic factors, and if they interact (G×E), we use a children- of-twins design. In a second sample, we measure genetic influence with polygenic risk scores (PRS) and environmental influence with a question on exposure to smoking during childhood. Methods: Data on smoking initiation were available for 723 children of 712 twins from the Netherlands Twin Register (64.9% female, median birth year 1985). Children were grouped in ascending order of risk, based on smoking status and zygosity of their twin-parent and his/her co-twin: never smoking twin-parent with a never smoking co-twin; never smoking twin-parent with a smoking dizygotic co-twin; never smoking twin-parent with a smoking monozygotic cotwin; and smoking twin-parent with a smoking or never smoking co-twin. For 4072 participants from the Netherlands Twin Register (67.3% female, median birth year 1973), PRS for smoking were computed and smoking initiation, smoking heaviness, and exposure to smoking during childhood were available. Results: Patterns of smoking initiation in the four group children-of-twins design suggested shared familial influences in addition to genetic factors. PRS for ever smoking were associated with smoking initiation in all individuals. PRS for smoking heaviness were associated with smoking heaviness in individuals exposed to smoking during childhood, but not in non-exposed individuals. Conclusions: Shared family environment influences smoking, over and above genetic factors. Genetic risk of smoking heaviness was only important for individuals exposed to smoking during childhood, versus those not exposed (G×E). Implications: This study adds to the very few existing children-of-twins (CoT) studies on smoking and combines a CoT design with a second research design that utilizes polygenic risk scores and data on exposure to smoking during childhood. The results show that shared family environment affects smoking behavior over and above genetic factors. There was also evidence for gene-environment interaction (G×E) such that genetic risk of heavy versus light smoking was only important for individuals who were also exposed to (second-hand) smoking during childhood. Together, these findings give additional incentive to recommending parents not to expose their children to cigarette smoking.

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DO - 10.1093/ntr/ntx121

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EP - 842

JO - Nicotine and Tobacco Research

T2 - Nicotine and Tobacco Research

JF - Nicotine and Tobacco Research

SN - 1462-2203

IS - 7

ER -