The ability to deal with difference: turkish-dutch professionals as go-betweens in the education sector

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Based on sixteen semi-structured interviews, this article examines how second-generation Turkish-Dutch education professionals experience their professional position in the ethnically homogeneous upper echelons of the Dutch education sector. The analysis shows that second-generation education professionals, being newcomers to higher-level positions in the sector, have to engage with diverse cultural repertoires at work. Instead of being stuck in-between these repertoires, second-generation education professionals actively “go-between” repertoires, employing their ability to deal with difference. In the increasingly super-diverse Dutch classrooms, this “go-between” attitude functions as a second-generation advantage and is conceptually better suited than in-betweenness to describe the position of second-generation professionals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-58
Number of pages14
JournalNew Directions for Child and Adolescent Development
Volume160
Early online date10 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018

Fingerprint

Professional Education
Aptitude
Education
Interviews

Bibliographical note

Special Issue: Navigating Pathways in Multicultural Nations: Identities, Future Orientation, Schooling, and Careers

Keywords

  • Go-Between
  • Second generation, professionals, education sector, ethnic school segregation, influence and change
  • Education
  • Professional identity

Cite this

@article{7a592995b1164e568c5b3a03c2b6cdc0,
title = "The ability to deal with difference: turkish-dutch professionals as go-betweens in the education sector",
abstract = "Based on sixteen semi-structured interviews, this article examines how second-generation Turkish-Dutch education professionals experience their professional position in the ethnically homogeneous upper echelons of the Dutch education sector. The analysis shows that second-generation education professionals, being newcomers to higher-level positions in the sector, have to engage with diverse cultural repertoires at work. Instead of being stuck in-between these repertoires, second-generation education professionals actively “go-between” repertoires, employing their ability to deal with difference. In the increasingly super-diverse Dutch classrooms, this “go-between” attitude functions as a second-generation advantage and is conceptually better suited than in-betweenness to describe the position of second-generation professionals.",
keywords = "Go-Between, Second generation, professionals, education sector, ethnic school segregation, influence and change, Education, Professional identity",
author = "Ismintha Waldring and Maurice Crul and Halleh Ghorashi",
note = "Special Issue: Navigating Pathways in Multicultural Nations: Identities, Future Orientation, Schooling, and Careers",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1002/cad.20242",
language = "English",
volume = "160",
pages = "45--58",
journal = "New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development",
issn = "1520-3247",
publisher = "Wiley",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The ability to deal with difference

T2 - turkish-dutch professionals as go-betweens in the education sector

AU - Waldring, Ismintha

AU - Crul, Maurice

AU - Ghorashi, Halleh

N1 - Special Issue: Navigating Pathways in Multicultural Nations: Identities, Future Orientation, Schooling, and Careers

PY - 2018/6

Y1 - 2018/6

N2 - Based on sixteen semi-structured interviews, this article examines how second-generation Turkish-Dutch education professionals experience their professional position in the ethnically homogeneous upper echelons of the Dutch education sector. The analysis shows that second-generation education professionals, being newcomers to higher-level positions in the sector, have to engage with diverse cultural repertoires at work. Instead of being stuck in-between these repertoires, second-generation education professionals actively “go-between” repertoires, employing their ability to deal with difference. In the increasingly super-diverse Dutch classrooms, this “go-between” attitude functions as a second-generation advantage and is conceptually better suited than in-betweenness to describe the position of second-generation professionals.

AB - Based on sixteen semi-structured interviews, this article examines how second-generation Turkish-Dutch education professionals experience their professional position in the ethnically homogeneous upper echelons of the Dutch education sector. The analysis shows that second-generation education professionals, being newcomers to higher-level positions in the sector, have to engage with diverse cultural repertoires at work. Instead of being stuck in-between these repertoires, second-generation education professionals actively “go-between” repertoires, employing their ability to deal with difference. In the increasingly super-diverse Dutch classrooms, this “go-between” attitude functions as a second-generation advantage and is conceptually better suited than in-betweenness to describe the position of second-generation professionals.

KW - Go-Between

KW - Second generation, professionals, education sector, ethnic school segregation, influence and change

KW - Education

KW - Professional identity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85054690335&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85054690335&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/cad.20242

DO - 10.1002/cad.20242

M3 - Article

VL - 160

SP - 45

EP - 58

JO - New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development

JF - New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development

SN - 1520-3247

ER -