The Adoption of Information Technology in the Sales Force’

N. Schillewaert, M. Ahearne, R.T. Frambach, R. Moenaert

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to explain why salespeople adopt information technology. The results from a cross-sectional study of 229 salespeople indicate that putting sales technology to use strongly depends on salespeople's perceptions about the technology enhancing their performance, their personal innovativeness and organizational efforts in terms of user training. Throughout the adoption process companies also need to target sales line managers-next to end users-because salespeople clearly comply with the expectations of their supervisors. Finally, the threat from competing sales professionals or peers who use similar sales technology seems to be of secondary importance for individual sales technology adoption. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-336
JournalIndustrial Marketing Management
Volume34
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Adoption of information technology
Sales force
Salespeople
Personal innovativeness
Line managers
Supervisors
End users
Peers
Technology adoption
Threat
Cross-sectional studies

Cite this

Schillewaert, N. ; Ahearne, M. ; Frambach, R.T. ; Moenaert, R. / The Adoption of Information Technology in the Sales Force’. In: Industrial Marketing Management. 2005 ; Vol. 34. pp. 323-336.
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The Adoption of Information Technology in the Sales Force’. / Schillewaert, N.; Ahearne, M.; Frambach, R.T.; Moenaert, R.

In: Industrial Marketing Management, Vol. 34, 2005, p. 323-336.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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