The architectural role of nucleoid-associated proteins in the organization of bacterial chromatin: A molecular perspective

M. S. Luijsterburg, M.C. Noom, G.J.L. Wuite, R.T. Dame

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The bacterial genome is folded into a compact structure called the nucleoid. Considerable compaction of the DNA molecule is required in order to reduce its volume below that of the cell. Several mechanisms, such as molecular crowding and DNA supercoiling contribute to the compactness of the nucleoid. Besides these mechanisms, a number of architectural proteins associate with the chromosomal DNA and cause it to fold into a compact structure by bridging, bending or wrapping DNA. In this review, we provide an overview of the major nucleoid-associated proteins from a structural perspective and we discuss their possible roles in dynamically shaping the bacterial nucleoid. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)262-272
JournalJournal of Structural Biology
Volume156
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Bibliographical note

The architectural role of nucleoid-associated proteins in the organization of bacterial chromatin: A molecular perspective

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