The Brentano illusion influences goal-directed movements of the left and right hand to the same extent

D.D.J. de Grave, E. Brenner, J.B.J. Smeets

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    Abstract

    Recently, Gonzalez et al. (J Neurophys 95:3496-3501, 2006) reported that movements with the left hand are more susceptible to visual size illusions than are those with the right hand. We hypothesized that this might be because proprioceptive information about the position of the left hand is less precise. If so, the difference between the hands should become clearer when vision of the hand is removed so that subjects can only rely on proprioception to locate their hand. We tested whether this was so by letting right-handed subjects make open-loop pointing movements within an illusory context with and without vision of their hand. On average, the illusion influenced the left and the right hand to the same extent, irrespective of the visibility of the hand. There were some systematic differences between the hands within certain regions of space, but these were not consistent across subjects. We conclude that there is no fundamental difference between the hands in susceptibility to the Brentano illusion.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)421-427
    JournalExperimental Brain Research
    Volume193
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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