The course of neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with dementia in primary care

Petra Borsje, Peter L B J Lucassen, Hans Bor, Roland B Wetzels, Anne Margriet Pot, Raymond T C M Koopmans

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: During the course of dementia, most people develop some type of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), which result in lower quality of life, high caregiver burden, psychotropic drug use and a major risk of institutionalization. Studies on NPS in people with dementia have been mainly conducted in clinical centres or psychiatric services.

Objectives: To investigate the course of NPS in people with dementia in primary care.

Methods: Analysis of (cumulative) prevalence and incidence, persistence and resolution based on data collected during an assessment at home of a prospective naturalistic cohort study in primary care in a sample of 117 people with dementia and their informal caregivers. Subsyndromes of NPS were assessed with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) and Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory. Multivariate analyses were used to detect determinants for the course of NPS.

Results: The mean age of the people with dementia was 78.6 years, and 52% were female. Mean Mini-Mental State Examination total score was 19.5, mean NPI total score 15.7. The most prevalent clinically relevant subsyndromes of the NPI were hyperactivity and mood/apathy, and the most prevalent individual NPS were aberrant motor behaviour (28%), agitation/aggression (24%) and apathy/indifference (22%). Of the people with dementia, 72.3% had one or more symptoms of the mood/apathy and 75.3% of the hyperactivity subsyndrome.

Conclusions: GPs should be aware of NPS in people with dementia and should actively identify them when they visit these patients or when informal caregivers consult them. Timely diagnosing facilitates adequate professional care.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFamily Practice
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 Dec 2018

Fingerprint

Dementia
Primary Health Care
Apathy
Caregivers
Equipment and Supplies
Institutionalization
Psychotropic Drugs
Aggression
Psychiatry
Cohort Studies
Multivariate Analysis
Quality of Life
Incidence

Cite this

Borsje, Petra ; Lucassen, Peter L B J ; Bor, Hans ; Wetzels, Roland B ; Pot, Anne Margriet ; Koopmans, Raymond T C M. / The course of neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with dementia in primary care. In: Family Practice. 2018.
@article{ea3c480ee7864e7280d9f37a73b4b5f4,
title = "The course of neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with dementia in primary care",
abstract = "Background: During the course of dementia, most people develop some type of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), which result in lower quality of life, high caregiver burden, psychotropic drug use and a major risk of institutionalization. Studies on NPS in people with dementia have been mainly conducted in clinical centres or psychiatric services.Objectives: To investigate the course of NPS in people with dementia in primary care.Methods: Analysis of (cumulative) prevalence and incidence, persistence and resolution based on data collected during an assessment at home of a prospective naturalistic cohort study in primary care in a sample of 117 people with dementia and their informal caregivers. Subsyndromes of NPS were assessed with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) and Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory. Multivariate analyses were used to detect determinants for the course of NPS.Results: The mean age of the people with dementia was 78.6 years, and 52{\%} were female. Mean Mini-Mental State Examination total score was 19.5, mean NPI total score 15.7. The most prevalent clinically relevant subsyndromes of the NPI were hyperactivity and mood/apathy, and the most prevalent individual NPS were aberrant motor behaviour (28{\%}), agitation/aggression (24{\%}) and apathy/indifference (22{\%}). Of the people with dementia, 72.3{\%} had one or more symptoms of the mood/apathy and 75.3{\%} of the hyperactivity subsyndrome.Conclusions: GPs should be aware of NPS in people with dementia and should actively identify them when they visit these patients or when informal caregivers consult them. Timely diagnosing facilitates adequate professional care.",
author = "Petra Borsje and Lucassen, {Peter L B J} and Hans Bor and Wetzels, {Roland B} and Pot, {Anne Margriet} and Koopmans, {Raymond T C M}",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1093/fampra/cmy117",
language = "English",
journal = "Family Practice",
issn = "0263-2136",
publisher = "Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press",

}

The course of neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with dementia in primary care. / Borsje, Petra; Lucassen, Peter L B J; Bor, Hans; Wetzels, Roland B; Pot, Anne Margriet; Koopmans, Raymond T C M.

In: Family Practice, 04.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The course of neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with dementia in primary care

AU - Borsje, Petra

AU - Lucassen, Peter L B J

AU - Bor, Hans

AU - Wetzels, Roland B

AU - Pot, Anne Margriet

AU - Koopmans, Raymond T C M

PY - 2018/12/4

Y1 - 2018/12/4

N2 - Background: During the course of dementia, most people develop some type of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), which result in lower quality of life, high caregiver burden, psychotropic drug use and a major risk of institutionalization. Studies on NPS in people with dementia have been mainly conducted in clinical centres or psychiatric services.Objectives: To investigate the course of NPS in people with dementia in primary care.Methods: Analysis of (cumulative) prevalence and incidence, persistence and resolution based on data collected during an assessment at home of a prospective naturalistic cohort study in primary care in a sample of 117 people with dementia and their informal caregivers. Subsyndromes of NPS were assessed with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) and Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory. Multivariate analyses were used to detect determinants for the course of NPS.Results: The mean age of the people with dementia was 78.6 years, and 52% were female. Mean Mini-Mental State Examination total score was 19.5, mean NPI total score 15.7. The most prevalent clinically relevant subsyndromes of the NPI were hyperactivity and mood/apathy, and the most prevalent individual NPS were aberrant motor behaviour (28%), agitation/aggression (24%) and apathy/indifference (22%). Of the people with dementia, 72.3% had one or more symptoms of the mood/apathy and 75.3% of the hyperactivity subsyndrome.Conclusions: GPs should be aware of NPS in people with dementia and should actively identify them when they visit these patients or when informal caregivers consult them. Timely diagnosing facilitates adequate professional care.

AB - Background: During the course of dementia, most people develop some type of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), which result in lower quality of life, high caregiver burden, psychotropic drug use and a major risk of institutionalization. Studies on NPS in people with dementia have been mainly conducted in clinical centres or psychiatric services.Objectives: To investigate the course of NPS in people with dementia in primary care.Methods: Analysis of (cumulative) prevalence and incidence, persistence and resolution based on data collected during an assessment at home of a prospective naturalistic cohort study in primary care in a sample of 117 people with dementia and their informal caregivers. Subsyndromes of NPS were assessed with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) and Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory. Multivariate analyses were used to detect determinants for the course of NPS.Results: The mean age of the people with dementia was 78.6 years, and 52% were female. Mean Mini-Mental State Examination total score was 19.5, mean NPI total score 15.7. The most prevalent clinically relevant subsyndromes of the NPI were hyperactivity and mood/apathy, and the most prevalent individual NPS were aberrant motor behaviour (28%), agitation/aggression (24%) and apathy/indifference (22%). Of the people with dementia, 72.3% had one or more symptoms of the mood/apathy and 75.3% of the hyperactivity subsyndrome.Conclusions: GPs should be aware of NPS in people with dementia and should actively identify them when they visit these patients or when informal caregivers consult them. Timely diagnosing facilitates adequate professional care.

U2 - 10.1093/fampra/cmy117

DO - 10.1093/fampra/cmy117

M3 - Article

JO - Family Practice

JF - Family Practice

SN - 0263-2136

ER -