The effect of illustrations in arithmetic problem-solving: Effects of increased cognitive load

I.E. Berends, E.C.D.M. van Lieshout

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Arithmetic word problems are often presented accompanied by illustrations. The present study examined how different types of illustrations influence the speed and accuracy of performance of both good (n = 67) and poor arithmeticians (n = 63). Twenty-four arithmetic word problems were presented with four types of illustrations with increasing information value. The results show that illustrations can have a detrimental effect on performance on arithmetic word problems, produced by irrelevant, redundant or interacting sources of information. Principles from cognitive load theory are used to explain the results, in particular in relation to (poor) working memory ability. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)345-353
Number of pages9
JournalLearning and Instruction
Volume19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Aptitude
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author = "I.E. Berends and {van Lieshout}, E.C.D.M.",
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The effect of illustrations in arithmetic problem-solving: Effects of increased cognitive load. / Berends, I.E.; van Lieshout, E.C.D.M.

In: Learning and Instruction, Vol. 19, 2009, p. 345-353.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Berends, I.E.

AU - van Lieshout, E.C.D.M.

PY - 2009

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N2 - Arithmetic word problems are often presented accompanied by illustrations. The present study examined how different types of illustrations influence the speed and accuracy of performance of both good (n = 67) and poor arithmeticians (n = 63). Twenty-four arithmetic word problems were presented with four types of illustrations with increasing information value. The results show that illustrations can have a detrimental effect on performance on arithmetic word problems, produced by irrelevant, redundant or interacting sources of information. Principles from cognitive load theory are used to explain the results, in particular in relation to (poor) working memory ability. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Arithmetic word problems are often presented accompanied by illustrations. The present study examined how different types of illustrations influence the speed and accuracy of performance of both good (n = 67) and poor arithmeticians (n = 63). Twenty-four arithmetic word problems were presented with four types of illustrations with increasing information value. The results show that illustrations can have a detrimental effect on performance on arithmetic word problems, produced by irrelevant, redundant or interacting sources of information. Principles from cognitive load theory are used to explain the results, in particular in relation to (poor) working memory ability. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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DO - 10.1016/j.learninstruc.2008.06.012

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 345

EP - 353

JO - Learning and Instruction

JF - Learning and Instruction

SN - 0959-4752

ER -