The effect of intergroup threat and social identity salience on the belief in conspiracy theories over terrorism in indonesia: Collective angst as a mediator

A. Mashuri, Esti Zaduqisti

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    The present study tested how intergroup threat (high versus low) and social identity as a Muslim (salient versus non-salient) affected belief in conspiracy theories. Data among Indonesian Muslim students (N = 139) from this study demonstrated that intergroup threat and social identity salience interacted to influence belief in conspiracy theories. High intergroup threat triggered greater belief in conspiracy theories than low intergroup threat, more prominently in the condition in which participants' Muslim identity was made salient. Collective angst also proved to mediate the effect of intergroup threat on the belief. However, in line with the prediction, evidence of this mediation effect of collective angst was only on the salient social identity condition. Discussions on these research findings build on both theoretical and practical implications. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)24-35
    Number of pages12
    JournalInternational Journal of Research Studies in Psychology
    Volume8
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2015

    Keywords

    • Belief in conspiracy theories
    • Collective angst
    • Intergroup threat
    • Social identity salience
    • Terrorism in Indonesia

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