The effect of patient-centeredness and gender of professional role models on trainees' mentalization responses. Implications for film-aided education

Katalin Bálint, Tamás Nagy, Márta Csabai

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To examine how certain characteristics of film-presented practitioner role-models influence trainees' mentalization. Methods: In an experimental setting, psychology students watched four film clips presenting a patient-practitioner session; the clips varied in the practitioner's patient-centeredness (positive vs. negative) and gender. Participants commented on the practitioner's thoughts, emotions and intentions through the session. Analysis of 116 comments focused on the effect of patient-centeredness and gender variables on mentalization and judgment utterances. Results: Negative role-models and female role-models induced higher levels of mentalization compared to positive and male role-models. There was no gender difference in the level of mentalization; however male participants gave more judgmental responses than female participants. The patient-centeredness had a larger effect on mentalization when trainees described the opposite gender role-model. Conclusion: In a systematic comparison, students' capacity for mentalization differed according to role-models' patient-centeredness and gender, as well as the gender-match of students with role-models. Practice implications: When working with film-presented role-models, educators should be aware of the differences in the level of mentalization elicited by positive and male role-models, as opposed to negative and female role-models. Educators should also consider the gender-match between trainees and role-models, therefore students should be exposed to both cross- and same-gender role-models.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPatient Education and Counseling
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd
Pages52-58
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)0738-3991, 0738-3991
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Publication series

NamePatient Education and Counseling
Volume97

Fingerprint

Professional Role
Education
Students
Surgical Instruments
Experimental Psychology
Motion Pictures
Emotions

Keywords

  • Film-aided education
  • Gender differences
  • Medical education
  • Mentalization
  • Patient-centeredness
  • Role modeling

Cite this

Bálint, Katalin ; Nagy, Tamás ; Csabai, Márta. / The effect of patient-centeredness and gender of professional role models on trainees' mentalization responses. Implications for film-aided education. Patient Education and Counseling. Elsevier Ireland Ltd, 2014. pp. 52-58 (Patient Education and Counseling).
@inbook{cb83b5786da140b8bb74a7b035702662,
title = "The effect of patient-centeredness and gender of professional role models on trainees' mentalization responses. Implications for film-aided education",
abstract = "Objective: To examine how certain characteristics of film-presented practitioner role-models influence trainees' mentalization. Methods: In an experimental setting, psychology students watched four film clips presenting a patient-practitioner session; the clips varied in the practitioner's patient-centeredness (positive vs. negative) and gender. Participants commented on the practitioner's thoughts, emotions and intentions through the session. Analysis of 116 comments focused on the effect of patient-centeredness and gender variables on mentalization and judgment utterances. Results: Negative role-models and female role-models induced higher levels of mentalization compared to positive and male role-models. There was no gender difference in the level of mentalization; however male participants gave more judgmental responses than female participants. The patient-centeredness had a larger effect on mentalization when trainees described the opposite gender role-model. Conclusion: In a systematic comparison, students' capacity for mentalization differed according to role-models' patient-centeredness and gender, as well as the gender-match of students with role-models. Practice implications: When working with film-presented role-models, educators should be aware of the differences in the level of mentalization elicited by positive and male role-models, as opposed to negative and female role-models. Educators should also consider the gender-match between trainees and role-models, therefore students should be exposed to both cross- and same-gender role-models.",
keywords = "Film-aided education, Gender differences, Medical education, Mentalization, Patient-centeredness, Role modeling",
author = "Katalin B{\'a}lint and Tam{\'a}s Nagy and M{\'a}rta Csabai",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1016/j.pec.2014.06.005",
language = "English",
isbn = "0738-3991",
series = "Patient Education and Counseling",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
pages = "52--58",
booktitle = "Patient Education and Counseling",
address = "Ireland",

}

The effect of patient-centeredness and gender of professional role models on trainees' mentalization responses. Implications for film-aided education. / Bálint, Katalin; Nagy, Tamás; Csabai, Márta.

Patient Education and Counseling. Elsevier Ireland Ltd, 2014. p. 52-58 (Patient Education and Counseling; Vol. 97).

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

TY - CHAP

T1 - The effect of patient-centeredness and gender of professional role models on trainees' mentalization responses. Implications for film-aided education

AU - Bálint, Katalin

AU - Nagy, Tamás

AU - Csabai, Márta

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Objective: To examine how certain characteristics of film-presented practitioner role-models influence trainees' mentalization. Methods: In an experimental setting, psychology students watched four film clips presenting a patient-practitioner session; the clips varied in the practitioner's patient-centeredness (positive vs. negative) and gender. Participants commented on the practitioner's thoughts, emotions and intentions through the session. Analysis of 116 comments focused on the effect of patient-centeredness and gender variables on mentalization and judgment utterances. Results: Negative role-models and female role-models induced higher levels of mentalization compared to positive and male role-models. There was no gender difference in the level of mentalization; however male participants gave more judgmental responses than female participants. The patient-centeredness had a larger effect on mentalization when trainees described the opposite gender role-model. Conclusion: In a systematic comparison, students' capacity for mentalization differed according to role-models' patient-centeredness and gender, as well as the gender-match of students with role-models. Practice implications: When working with film-presented role-models, educators should be aware of the differences in the level of mentalization elicited by positive and male role-models, as opposed to negative and female role-models. Educators should also consider the gender-match between trainees and role-models, therefore students should be exposed to both cross- and same-gender role-models.

AB - Objective: To examine how certain characteristics of film-presented practitioner role-models influence trainees' mentalization. Methods: In an experimental setting, psychology students watched four film clips presenting a patient-practitioner session; the clips varied in the practitioner's patient-centeredness (positive vs. negative) and gender. Participants commented on the practitioner's thoughts, emotions and intentions through the session. Analysis of 116 comments focused on the effect of patient-centeredness and gender variables on mentalization and judgment utterances. Results: Negative role-models and female role-models induced higher levels of mentalization compared to positive and male role-models. There was no gender difference in the level of mentalization; however male participants gave more judgmental responses than female participants. The patient-centeredness had a larger effect on mentalization when trainees described the opposite gender role-model. Conclusion: In a systematic comparison, students' capacity for mentalization differed according to role-models' patient-centeredness and gender, as well as the gender-match of students with role-models. Practice implications: When working with film-presented role-models, educators should be aware of the differences in the level of mentalization elicited by positive and male role-models, as opposed to negative and female role-models. Educators should also consider the gender-match between trainees and role-models, therefore students should be exposed to both cross- and same-gender role-models.

KW - Film-aided education

KW - Gender differences

KW - Medical education

KW - Mentalization

KW - Patient-centeredness

KW - Role modeling

U2 - 10.1016/j.pec.2014.06.005

DO - 10.1016/j.pec.2014.06.005

M3 - Chapter

SN - 0738-3991

SN - 0738-3991

T3 - Patient Education and Counseling

SP - 52

EP - 58

BT - Patient Education and Counseling

PB - Elsevier Ireland Ltd

ER -