The effects of baseball experience on movement initiation in catching fly balls

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Previous research has shown that skilled athletes are able to respond faster than novices to skill-specific information. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether expert outfielders are faster than non-experts in acting on information about the flight of a fly ball. It was hypothesized that expert outfielders are better attuned to this information; as a result, faster and more accurate responses were expected. This hypothesis was tested by having non-expert and expert outfielders judge, as quickly as possible, where a ball would land in the front-behind dimension (perceptual condition) and, in another condition, to attempt to catch such balls (catching condition). The results of the perceptual condition do not support the hypothesis that expert outfielders are more sensitive to ball flight information than non-experts, but the results of the catching condition reveal that experts are more likely to initiate locomotion in the correct direction.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)587-595
    JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
    Volume15
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1997

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    title = "The effects of baseball experience on movement initiation in catching fly balls",
    abstract = "Previous research has shown that skilled athletes are able to respond faster than novices to skill-specific information. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether expert outfielders are faster than non-experts in acting on information about the flight of a fly ball. It was hypothesized that expert outfielders are better attuned to this information; as a result, faster and more accurate responses were expected. This hypothesis was tested by having non-expert and expert outfielders judge, as quickly as possible, where a ball would land in the front-behind dimension (perceptual condition) and, in another condition, to attempt to catch such balls (catching condition). The results of the perceptual condition do not support the hypothesis that expert outfielders are more sensitive to ball flight information than non-experts, but the results of the catching condition reveal that experts are more likely to initiate locomotion in the correct direction.",
    author = "R.R.D. Oudejans and C.F. Michaels and F.C. Bakker",
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    The effects of baseball experience on movement initiation in catching fly balls. / Oudejans, R.R.D.; Michaels, C.F.; Bakker, F.C.

    In: Journal of Sports Sciences, Vol. 15, 1997, p. 587-595.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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    AB - Previous research has shown that skilled athletes are able to respond faster than novices to skill-specific information. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether expert outfielders are faster than non-experts in acting on information about the flight of a fly ball. It was hypothesized that expert outfielders are better attuned to this information; as a result, faster and more accurate responses were expected. This hypothesis was tested by having non-expert and expert outfielders judge, as quickly as possible, where a ball would land in the front-behind dimension (perceptual condition) and, in another condition, to attempt to catch such balls (catching condition). The results of the perceptual condition do not support the hypothesis that expert outfielders are more sensitive to ball flight information than non-experts, but the results of the catching condition reveal that experts are more likely to initiate locomotion in the correct direction.

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