The effects of knee arthroplaste on walking speed. A meta-analysis.

H. Abbasi Bafghi, H.R. FallahYakhdani, O.G. Meijer, H.C.W. de Vet, S.M. Bruijn, L.Y. Yang, B.J. van Royen, J.H. van Dieen

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Background: Patients with knee osteoarthritis patients have problems with walking, and tend to walk slower. An important aim of knee arthroplasty is functional recovery, which should include a post-operative increase in walking speed. Still, there are several problems with measuring walking speed in groups of knee osteoarthritis patients. Nevertheless, test-retest reliability of walking speed measurements is high, and when the same investigators monitor the same subjects, it should be possible to assess the walking speed effects of knee arthroplasty. The present study reports a meta-analysis of these effects. Methods. A total of 16 independent pre-post arthroplasty comparisons of walking speed were identified through MEDLINE, Web of Science, and PEDro, in 12 papers, involving 419 patients. Results: For 0.5-5 months post-operatively, heterogeneity was too large to obtain a valid estimate of the overall effect-size. For 6-12 and 13-60 months post-operatively, heterogeneity was absent, low, or moderate (depending on estimated pre-post correlations). During these periods, subjects walked on average 0.8 standard-deviations faster than pre-operatively, which is a large effect. Meta-regression analysis revealed significant effects of time and time squared, suggesting initial improvement followed by decline. Conclusion: This meta-analysis revealed a large effect of arthroplasty on walking speed 6-60 months post-operatively. For the first 0.5-5 months, heterogeneity of effect-sizes precluded a valid estimate of short-term effects. Hence, patients may expect a considerable improvement of their walking speed, which, however, may take several months to occur. Meta-regression analysis suggested a small decline from 13 months post-operatively onwards. © 2012 Abbasi-Bafghi et al; BioMed Central Ltd.
    LanguageEnglish
    Article number66
    JournalBMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
    Volume13
    Early online date6 May 2012
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

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    Meta-Analysis
    Knee
    Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
    Knee Osteoarthritis
    Arthroplasty
    Regression Analysis
    Walking Speed
    Reproducibility of Results
    MEDLINE
    Walking
    Research Personnel

    Cite this

    Abbasi Bafghi, H. ; FallahYakhdani, H.R. ; Meijer, O.G. ; de Vet, H.C.W. ; Bruijn, S.M. ; Yang, L.Y. ; van Royen, B.J. ; van Dieen, J.H. / The effects of knee arthroplaste on walking speed. A meta-analysis. In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders. 2012 ; Vol. 13.
    @article{475eb2e3319c4320a4510758226ccee0,
    title = "The effects of knee arthroplaste on walking speed. A meta-analysis.",
    abstract = "Background: Patients with knee osteoarthritis patients have problems with walking, and tend to walk slower. An important aim of knee arthroplasty is functional recovery, which should include a post-operative increase in walking speed. Still, there are several problems with measuring walking speed in groups of knee osteoarthritis patients. Nevertheless, test-retest reliability of walking speed measurements is high, and when the same investigators monitor the same subjects, it should be possible to assess the walking speed effects of knee arthroplasty. The present study reports a meta-analysis of these effects. Methods. A total of 16 independent pre-post arthroplasty comparisons of walking speed were identified through MEDLINE, Web of Science, and PEDro, in 12 papers, involving 419 patients. Results: For 0.5-5 months post-operatively, heterogeneity was too large to obtain a valid estimate of the overall effect-size. For 6-12 and 13-60 months post-operatively, heterogeneity was absent, low, or moderate (depending on estimated pre-post correlations). During these periods, subjects walked on average 0.8 standard-deviations faster than pre-operatively, which is a large effect. Meta-regression analysis revealed significant effects of time and time squared, suggesting initial improvement followed by decline. Conclusion: This meta-analysis revealed a large effect of arthroplasty on walking speed 6-60 months post-operatively. For the first 0.5-5 months, heterogeneity of effect-sizes precluded a valid estimate of short-term effects. Hence, patients may expect a considerable improvement of their walking speed, which, however, may take several months to occur. Meta-regression analysis suggested a small decline from 13 months post-operatively onwards. {\circledC} 2012 Abbasi-Bafghi et al; BioMed Central Ltd.",
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    year = "2012",
    doi = "10.1186/1471-2474-13-66",
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    The effects of knee arthroplaste on walking speed. A meta-analysis. / Abbasi Bafghi, H.; FallahYakhdani, H.R.; Meijer, O.G.; de Vet, H.C.W.; Bruijn, S.M.; Yang, L.Y.; van Royen, B.J.; van Dieen, J.H.

    In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, Vol. 13, 66, 2012.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The effects of knee arthroplaste on walking speed. A meta-analysis.

    AU - Abbasi Bafghi, H.

    AU - FallahYakhdani, H.R.

    AU - Meijer, O.G.

    AU - de Vet, H.C.W.

    AU - Bruijn, S.M.

    AU - Yang, L.Y.

    AU - van Royen, B.J.

    AU - van Dieen, J.H.

    PY - 2012

    Y1 - 2012

    N2 - Background: Patients with knee osteoarthritis patients have problems with walking, and tend to walk slower. An important aim of knee arthroplasty is functional recovery, which should include a post-operative increase in walking speed. Still, there are several problems with measuring walking speed in groups of knee osteoarthritis patients. Nevertheless, test-retest reliability of walking speed measurements is high, and when the same investigators monitor the same subjects, it should be possible to assess the walking speed effects of knee arthroplasty. The present study reports a meta-analysis of these effects. Methods. A total of 16 independent pre-post arthroplasty comparisons of walking speed were identified through MEDLINE, Web of Science, and PEDro, in 12 papers, involving 419 patients. Results: For 0.5-5 months post-operatively, heterogeneity was too large to obtain a valid estimate of the overall effect-size. For 6-12 and 13-60 months post-operatively, heterogeneity was absent, low, or moderate (depending on estimated pre-post correlations). During these periods, subjects walked on average 0.8 standard-deviations faster than pre-operatively, which is a large effect. Meta-regression analysis revealed significant effects of time and time squared, suggesting initial improvement followed by decline. Conclusion: This meta-analysis revealed a large effect of arthroplasty on walking speed 6-60 months post-operatively. For the first 0.5-5 months, heterogeneity of effect-sizes precluded a valid estimate of short-term effects. Hence, patients may expect a considerable improvement of their walking speed, which, however, may take several months to occur. Meta-regression analysis suggested a small decline from 13 months post-operatively onwards. © 2012 Abbasi-Bafghi et al; BioMed Central Ltd.

    AB - Background: Patients with knee osteoarthritis patients have problems with walking, and tend to walk slower. An important aim of knee arthroplasty is functional recovery, which should include a post-operative increase in walking speed. Still, there are several problems with measuring walking speed in groups of knee osteoarthritis patients. Nevertheless, test-retest reliability of walking speed measurements is high, and when the same investigators monitor the same subjects, it should be possible to assess the walking speed effects of knee arthroplasty. The present study reports a meta-analysis of these effects. Methods. A total of 16 independent pre-post arthroplasty comparisons of walking speed were identified through MEDLINE, Web of Science, and PEDro, in 12 papers, involving 419 patients. Results: For 0.5-5 months post-operatively, heterogeneity was too large to obtain a valid estimate of the overall effect-size. For 6-12 and 13-60 months post-operatively, heterogeneity was absent, low, or moderate (depending on estimated pre-post correlations). During these periods, subjects walked on average 0.8 standard-deviations faster than pre-operatively, which is a large effect. Meta-regression analysis revealed significant effects of time and time squared, suggesting initial improvement followed by decline. Conclusion: This meta-analysis revealed a large effect of arthroplasty on walking speed 6-60 months post-operatively. For the first 0.5-5 months, heterogeneity of effect-sizes precluded a valid estimate of short-term effects. Hence, patients may expect a considerable improvement of their walking speed, which, however, may take several months to occur. Meta-regression analysis suggested a small decline from 13 months post-operatively onwards. © 2012 Abbasi-Bafghi et al; BioMed Central Ltd.

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    DO - 10.1186/1471-2474-13-66

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    VL - 13

    JO - BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

    T2 - BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

    JF - BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

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    ER -