The effects of TV commercials using less thin models on young women's mood, body image and actual food intake

Doeschka J Anschutz, Rutger C M E Engels, Eni S Becker, Tatjana van Strien

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This study experimentally tested the effects of exposure to television commercials using less thin models on mood, body focused anxiety and food intake, as compared to the effects of commercials using thin models. In a naturalistic setting, 110 young women were exposed to a neutral movie, interrupted by two commercial breaks. The commercial breaks contained real commercials using either less thin (n=32) or thin models (n=39), or neutral commercials (n=39). During watching television, participants could freely eat snack food. Further, their mood and body focused anxiety was assessed. ANOVAs revealed no effects on body focused anxiety, but women reported a more negative mood and ate less after exposure to commercials using less thin models than after exposure to commercials using thin models. These results imply that using less thin models in commercials explicitly referring to the thin ideal does not make women feel better.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)270-6
Number of pages7
JournalBody Image
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2009

Keywords

  • Advertising as Topic
  • Affect
  • Anxiety
  • Body Image
  • Eating
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Imitative Behavior
  • Students
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Television
  • Thinness
  • Young Adult
  • Journal Article

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