The home food environment of overweight gatekeepers in the Netherlands

M.P. Poelman, E.W.M.L. de Vet, E. Velema, J.C. Seidell, I.H.M. Steenhuis

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The aim of the present study was to gain insight into (i) processed snack-food availability, (ii) processed snack-food salience and (iii) the size of dinnerware among households with overweight gatekeepers. Moreover, associations between gatekeepers' characteristics and in-home observations were determined. Design: A cross-sectional observation of home food environments was conducted as part of a baseline measurement of a larger study. Setting: Home food environments of overweight and obese gatekeepers in the Netherlands. Subjects: Household gatekeepers (n 278). Mean household size of the gatekeepers was 3·0 (SD 1·3) persons. Mean age of the gatekeepers was 45·7 (SD 9·2) years, 34·9 % were overweight and 65·1 % were obese. Of the gatekeepers, 20·9 % had a low level of education and 42·7 % had a high level of education. Results: In 70 % of the households, eight or more packages of processed snack foods were present. In 54 % of the households, processed snack foods were stored close to non-processed food items and in 78 % of households close to non-food items. In 33 % of the households, processed snack foods were visible in the kitchen and in 15 % of the households processed snack foods were visible in the living room. Of the dinnerware items, 14 % (plates), 57 % (glasses), 78 % (dessert bowls), 67 % (soup bowls) and 58 % (mugs) were larger than the reference norms of the Netherlands Nutrition Centre Foundation. Older gatekeepers used significantly smaller dinnerware than younger gatekeepers. Conclusions: Environmental factors endorsing overconsumption are commonly present in the home environments of overweight people and could lead to unplanned eating or passive overconsumption.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1815-1823
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Netherlands
Snacks
Food
Education
Glass
Eating
Observation

Cite this

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title = "The home food environment of overweight gatekeepers in the Netherlands",
abstract = "Objective: The aim of the present study was to gain insight into (i) processed snack-food availability, (ii) processed snack-food salience and (iii) the size of dinnerware among households with overweight gatekeepers. Moreover, associations between gatekeepers' characteristics and in-home observations were determined. Design: A cross-sectional observation of home food environments was conducted as part of a baseline measurement of a larger study. Setting: Home food environments of overweight and obese gatekeepers in the Netherlands. Subjects: Household gatekeepers (n 278). Mean household size of the gatekeepers was 3·0 (SD 1·3) persons. Mean age of the gatekeepers was 45·7 (SD 9·2) years, 34·9 {\%} were overweight and 65·1 {\%} were obese. Of the gatekeepers, 20·9 {\%} had a low level of education and 42·7 {\%} had a high level of education. Results: In 70 {\%} of the households, eight or more packages of processed snack foods were present. In 54 {\%} of the households, processed snack foods were stored close to non-processed food items and in 78 {\%} of households close to non-food items. In 33 {\%} of the households, processed snack foods were visible in the kitchen and in 15 {\%} of the households processed snack foods were visible in the living room. Of the dinnerware items, 14 {\%} (plates), 57 {\%} (glasses), 78 {\%} (dessert bowls), 67 {\%} (soup bowls) and 58 {\%} (mugs) were larger than the reference norms of the Netherlands Nutrition Centre Foundation. Older gatekeepers used significantly smaller dinnerware than younger gatekeepers. Conclusions: Environmental factors endorsing overconsumption are commonly present in the home environments of overweight people and could lead to unplanned eating or passive overconsumption.",
author = "M.P. Poelman and {de Vet}, E.W.M.L. and E. Velema and J.C. Seidell and I.H.M. Steenhuis",
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The home food environment of overweight gatekeepers in the Netherlands. / Poelman, M.P.; de Vet, E.W.M.L.; Velema, E.; Seidell, J.C.; Steenhuis, I.H.M.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 18, No. 10, 2015, p. 1815-1823.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The home food environment of overweight gatekeepers in the Netherlands

AU - Poelman, M.P.

AU - de Vet, E.W.M.L.

AU - Velema, E.

AU - Seidell, J.C.

AU - Steenhuis, I.H.M.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Objective: The aim of the present study was to gain insight into (i) processed snack-food availability, (ii) processed snack-food salience and (iii) the size of dinnerware among households with overweight gatekeepers. Moreover, associations between gatekeepers' characteristics and in-home observations were determined. Design: A cross-sectional observation of home food environments was conducted as part of a baseline measurement of a larger study. Setting: Home food environments of overweight and obese gatekeepers in the Netherlands. Subjects: Household gatekeepers (n 278). Mean household size of the gatekeepers was 3·0 (SD 1·3) persons. Mean age of the gatekeepers was 45·7 (SD 9·2) years, 34·9 % were overweight and 65·1 % were obese. Of the gatekeepers, 20·9 % had a low level of education and 42·7 % had a high level of education. Results: In 70 % of the households, eight or more packages of processed snack foods were present. In 54 % of the households, processed snack foods were stored close to non-processed food items and in 78 % of households close to non-food items. In 33 % of the households, processed snack foods were visible in the kitchen and in 15 % of the households processed snack foods were visible in the living room. Of the dinnerware items, 14 % (plates), 57 % (glasses), 78 % (dessert bowls), 67 % (soup bowls) and 58 % (mugs) were larger than the reference norms of the Netherlands Nutrition Centre Foundation. Older gatekeepers used significantly smaller dinnerware than younger gatekeepers. Conclusions: Environmental factors endorsing overconsumption are commonly present in the home environments of overweight people and could lead to unplanned eating or passive overconsumption.

AB - Objective: The aim of the present study was to gain insight into (i) processed snack-food availability, (ii) processed snack-food salience and (iii) the size of dinnerware among households with overweight gatekeepers. Moreover, associations between gatekeepers' characteristics and in-home observations were determined. Design: A cross-sectional observation of home food environments was conducted as part of a baseline measurement of a larger study. Setting: Home food environments of overweight and obese gatekeepers in the Netherlands. Subjects: Household gatekeepers (n 278). Mean household size of the gatekeepers was 3·0 (SD 1·3) persons. Mean age of the gatekeepers was 45·7 (SD 9·2) years, 34·9 % were overweight and 65·1 % were obese. Of the gatekeepers, 20·9 % had a low level of education and 42·7 % had a high level of education. Results: In 70 % of the households, eight or more packages of processed snack foods were present. In 54 % of the households, processed snack foods were stored close to non-processed food items and in 78 % of households close to non-food items. In 33 % of the households, processed snack foods were visible in the kitchen and in 15 % of the households processed snack foods were visible in the living room. Of the dinnerware items, 14 % (plates), 57 % (glasses), 78 % (dessert bowls), 67 % (soup bowls) and 58 % (mugs) were larger than the reference norms of the Netherlands Nutrition Centre Foundation. Older gatekeepers used significantly smaller dinnerware than younger gatekeepers. Conclusions: Environmental factors endorsing overconsumption are commonly present in the home environments of overweight people and could lead to unplanned eating or passive overconsumption.

U2 - 10.1017/S1368980014002298

DO - 10.1017/S1368980014002298

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 1815

EP - 1823

JO - Public Health Nutrition

T2 - Public Health Nutrition

JF - Public Health Nutrition

SN - 1368-9800

IS - 10

ER -