The impact of controlling for extreme responding on measurement equivalence in cross-cultural research

M.H. Morren, J.P.T.M. Gelissen, J.K. Vermunt

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Prior research has shown that extreme response style can seriously bias responses to survey questions and that this response style may differ across culturally diverse groups. Consequently, cross-cultural differences in extreme responding may yield incomparable responses when not controlled for. To examine how extreme responding affects the cross-cultural comparability of survey responses, we propose and apply a multiple-group latent class approach where groups are compared on basis of the factor loadings, intercepts, and factor means in a Latent Class Factor Model. In this approach a latent factor measuring the response style is explicitly included as an explanation for group differences found in the data. Findings from two empirical applications that examine the cross-cultural comparability of measurements show that group differences in responding import inequivalence in measurements among groups. Controlling for the response style yields more equivalent measurements. This finding emphasizes the importance of correcting for response style in cross-cultural research. © 2011 Hogrefe Publishing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-170
JournalMethodology: European Journal of Research Methods for the Behavioral and Social Sciences
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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