The impact of land use and climate change on late Holocene and future suspended sediment yield of the Meuse catchment

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    In this study we investigate the relative importance of changes in land use and climate on suspended sediment yield (SY) on millennial timescales in the Meuse basin. We use a spatially distributed soil erosion and sediment delivery model (WATEM/SEDEM) to simulate SY in three time-periods: 4000-3000 BP (minimal anthropogenic influence); 1000-2000 AD (includes land use and climate change); and the 21st Century. Changes in climate are based on climate model output (ECBilt-CLIO-VECODE). For the 21st Century the model is forced according to two emission scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), namely the SRES scenarios A2 and B1. These scenarios lie towards the higher and lower end of the full IPCC scenario range respectively. For 4000-3000 BP the basin is assumed to be almost fully forested; for 1000-2000 AD land use is reconstructed using CORINE data, historical sources, and land use modelling; and for the 21st Century land use is based on the European land use change project EURURALIS. Whilst rainfall erosivity increases by only 3% between 4000-3000 BP and 1000-2000 AD, SY increases from ca. 92 000 Mg a
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)389-400
    JournalGeomorphology
    Volume103
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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    sediment yield
    suspended sediment
    land use change
    twenty first century
    Holocene
    catchment
    land use
    climate change
    Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
    erosivity
    climate
    basin
    soil erosion
    climate modeling
    timescale
    rainfall
    sediment
    modeling

    Cite this

    @article{313ee40e3881409b81ab97a074a58423,
    title = "The impact of land use and climate change on late Holocene and future suspended sediment yield of the Meuse catchment",
    abstract = "In this study we investigate the relative importance of changes in land use and climate on suspended sediment yield (SY) on millennial timescales in the Meuse basin. We use a spatially distributed soil erosion and sediment delivery model (WATEM/SEDEM) to simulate SY in three time-periods: 4000-3000 BP (minimal anthropogenic influence); 1000-2000 AD (includes land use and climate change); and the 21st Century. Changes in climate are based on climate model output (ECBilt-CLIO-VECODE). For the 21st Century the model is forced according to two emission scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), namely the SRES scenarios A2 and B1. These scenarios lie towards the higher and lower end of the full IPCC scenario range respectively. For 4000-3000 BP the basin is assumed to be almost fully forested; for 1000-2000 AD land use is reconstructed using CORINE data, historical sources, and land use modelling; and for the 21st Century land use is based on the European land use change project EURURALIS. Whilst rainfall erosivity increases by only 3{\%} between 4000-3000 BP and 1000-2000 AD, SY increases from ca. 92 000 Mg a",
    author = "P.J. Ward and {van Balen}, R.T. and G. Verstraeten and H. Renssen and J. Vandenberghe",
    year = "2009",
    doi = "10.1016/j.geomorph.2008.07.006",
    language = "English",
    volume = "103",
    pages = "389--400",
    journal = "Geomorphology",
    issn = "0169-555X",
    publisher = "Elsevier",
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    }

    The impact of land use and climate change on late Holocene and future suspended sediment yield of the Meuse catchment. / Ward, P.J.; van Balen, R.T.; Verstraeten, G.; Renssen, H.; Vandenberghe, J.

    In: Geomorphology, Vol. 103, No. 3, 2009, p. 389-400.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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    AU - Ward, P.J.

    AU - van Balen, R.T.

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    AU - Vandenberghe, J.

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    AB - In this study we investigate the relative importance of changes in land use and climate on suspended sediment yield (SY) on millennial timescales in the Meuse basin. We use a spatially distributed soil erosion and sediment delivery model (WATEM/SEDEM) to simulate SY in three time-periods: 4000-3000 BP (minimal anthropogenic influence); 1000-2000 AD (includes land use and climate change); and the 21st Century. Changes in climate are based on climate model output (ECBilt-CLIO-VECODE). For the 21st Century the model is forced according to two emission scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), namely the SRES scenarios A2 and B1. These scenarios lie towards the higher and lower end of the full IPCC scenario range respectively. For 4000-3000 BP the basin is assumed to be almost fully forested; for 1000-2000 AD land use is reconstructed using CORINE data, historical sources, and land use modelling; and for the 21st Century land use is based on the European land use change project EURURALIS. Whilst rainfall erosivity increases by only 3% between 4000-3000 BP and 1000-2000 AD, SY increases from ca. 92 000 Mg a

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