The importance of shared environment in mother-infant attachment security: A behavioral genetic study [IF: 3.272]

C.L. Bokhorst, M.J. Bakermans-Kranenburg, R.M. Fearon, M.H. van IJzendoorn, P. Fonagy, C. Schuengel

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

In a sample of 157 monozygotic and dizygotic twins, genetic and environmental influences on infant attachment and temperament were quantified. Only unique environmental or error components could explain the variance in disorganized versus organized attachment as assessed in the Ainsworth Strange Situation Procedure. For secure versus nonsecure attachment, 52% of the variance in attachment security was explained by shared environment, and 48% of the variance was explained by unique environmental factors and measurement error. The role of genetic factors in attachment disorganization and attachment security was negligible. Genetic factors explained 77% of the variance in temperamental reactivity, and unique environmental factors and measurement error explained 23%. Differences in temperamental reactivity were not associated with attachment concordance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1769-1782
Number of pages14
JournalChild Development
Volume74
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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Behavioral Genetics
Dizygotic Twins
Temperament
Monozygotic Twins
infant
heredity
Mothers
environmental factors

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@article{4536ea962807442e8c6fa0cbdb4a13fe,
title = "The importance of shared environment in mother-infant attachment security: A behavioral genetic study [IF: 3.272]",
abstract = "In a sample of 157 monozygotic and dizygotic twins, genetic and environmental influences on infant attachment and temperament were quantified. Only unique environmental or error components could explain the variance in disorganized versus organized attachment as assessed in the Ainsworth Strange Situation Procedure. For secure versus nonsecure attachment, 52{\%} of the variance in attachment security was explained by shared environment, and 48{\%} of the variance was explained by unique environmental factors and measurement error. The role of genetic factors in attachment disorganization and attachment security was negligible. Genetic factors explained 77{\%} of the variance in temperamental reactivity, and unique environmental factors and measurement error explained 23{\%}. Differences in temperamental reactivity were not associated with attachment concordance.",
author = "C.L. Bokhorst and M.J. Bakermans-Kranenburg and R.M. Fearon and {van IJzendoorn}, M.H. and P. Fonagy and C. Schuengel",
year = "2003",
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language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "1769--1782",
journal = "Child Development",
issn = "0009-3920",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
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}

The importance of shared environment in mother-infant attachment security: A behavioral genetic study [IF: 3.272]. / Bokhorst, C.L.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J.; Fearon, R.M.; van IJzendoorn, M.H.; Fonagy, P.; Schuengel, C.

In: Child Development, Vol. 74, No. 6, 2003, p. 1769-1782.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - The importance of shared environment in mother-infant attachment security: A behavioral genetic study [IF: 3.272]

AU - Bokhorst, C.L.

AU - Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J.

AU - Fearon, R.M.

AU - van IJzendoorn, M.H.

AU - Fonagy, P.

AU - Schuengel, C.

PY - 2003

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AB - In a sample of 157 monozygotic and dizygotic twins, genetic and environmental influences on infant attachment and temperament were quantified. Only unique environmental or error components could explain the variance in disorganized versus organized attachment as assessed in the Ainsworth Strange Situation Procedure. For secure versus nonsecure attachment, 52% of the variance in attachment security was explained by shared environment, and 48% of the variance was explained by unique environmental factors and measurement error. The role of genetic factors in attachment disorganization and attachment security was negligible. Genetic factors explained 77% of the variance in temperamental reactivity, and unique environmental factors and measurement error explained 23%. Differences in temperamental reactivity were not associated with attachment concordance.

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DO - 10.1046/j.1467-8624.2003.00637.x

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