The linkage between infant negative temperament and parenting self-efficacy: The role of resilience against negative performance feedback

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Caring for infants with negative reactive temperament may tax parents' confidence in their caregiving ability, or parenting self-efficacy (PSE). This may happen in particular in parents who interpret these signals as negative feedback on their performance. To test this hypothesis, 179 first-time pregnant women were presented a caregiving simulation that provided positive and negative feedback on their attempts to comfort a crying baby. According to their PSE resilience to negative feedback during the task, they were grouped in a high resilient and low resilient group. PSE was followed up at 32 weeks of pregnancy and 3 and 12 months after birth, while perceived temperament of the child was assessed at 3 and 12 months after birth. Results showed that among women with low resilience against negative feedback, perceived negative temperament was negatively associated with PSE at 3 months, whereas no such association was observed among women with high resilience against negative feedback. Implications of the concept of resilience for the study of PSE are discussed. Copyright
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)506-518
JournalBritish Journal of Developmental Psychology
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Temperament
Parenting
Self Efficacy
Parents
Parturition
Crying
Aptitude
Pregnant Women
Pregnancy

Cite this

@article{69179d38076646a6912d9035b3c03167,
title = "The linkage between infant negative temperament and parenting self-efficacy: The role of resilience against negative performance feedback",
abstract = "Caring for infants with negative reactive temperament may tax parents' confidence in their caregiving ability, or parenting self-efficacy (PSE). This may happen in particular in parents who interpret these signals as negative feedback on their performance. To test this hypothesis, 179 first-time pregnant women were presented a caregiving simulation that provided positive and negative feedback on their attempts to comfort a crying baby. According to their PSE resilience to negative feedback during the task, they were grouped in a high resilient and low resilient group. PSE was followed up at 32 weeks of pregnancy and 3 and 12 months after birth, while perceived temperament of the child was assessed at 3 and 12 months after birth. Results showed that among women with low resilience against negative feedback, perceived negative temperament was negatively associated with PSE at 3 months, whereas no such association was observed among women with high resilience against negative feedback. Implications of the concept of resilience for the study of PSE are discussed. Copyright",
author = "M.L. Verhage and M. Oosterman and C. Schuengel",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1111/bjdp.12113",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "506--518",
journal = "British Journal of Developmental Psychology",
issn = "0261-510X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The linkage between infant negative temperament and parenting self-efficacy: The role of resilience against negative performance feedback

AU - Verhage, M.L.

AU - Oosterman, M.

AU - Schuengel, C.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Caring for infants with negative reactive temperament may tax parents' confidence in their caregiving ability, or parenting self-efficacy (PSE). This may happen in particular in parents who interpret these signals as negative feedback on their performance. To test this hypothesis, 179 first-time pregnant women were presented a caregiving simulation that provided positive and negative feedback on their attempts to comfort a crying baby. According to their PSE resilience to negative feedback during the task, they were grouped in a high resilient and low resilient group. PSE was followed up at 32 weeks of pregnancy and 3 and 12 months after birth, while perceived temperament of the child was assessed at 3 and 12 months after birth. Results showed that among women with low resilience against negative feedback, perceived negative temperament was negatively associated with PSE at 3 months, whereas no such association was observed among women with high resilience against negative feedback. Implications of the concept of resilience for the study of PSE are discussed. Copyright

AB - Caring for infants with negative reactive temperament may tax parents' confidence in their caregiving ability, or parenting self-efficacy (PSE). This may happen in particular in parents who interpret these signals as negative feedback on their performance. To test this hypothesis, 179 first-time pregnant women were presented a caregiving simulation that provided positive and negative feedback on their attempts to comfort a crying baby. According to their PSE resilience to negative feedback during the task, they were grouped in a high resilient and low resilient group. PSE was followed up at 32 weeks of pregnancy and 3 and 12 months after birth, while perceived temperament of the child was assessed at 3 and 12 months after birth. Results showed that among women with low resilience against negative feedback, perceived negative temperament was negatively associated with PSE at 3 months, whereas no such association was observed among women with high resilience against negative feedback. Implications of the concept of resilience for the study of PSE are discussed. Copyright

U2 - 10.1111/bjdp.12113

DO - 10.1111/bjdp.12113

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 506

EP - 518

JO - British Journal of Developmental Psychology

JF - British Journal of Developmental Psychology

SN - 0261-510X

IS - 4

ER -