The long arm of the state? Transnationalism, Islam, and nation-building: the case of Turkey and Morocco

Thijl Sunier, Heleen van der Linden, Ellen van de Bovenkamp

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

From the moment the first Turkish and Moroccan workers migrated to Europe in the early 1960s, the Turkish and Moroccan states have been concerned with how to bind emigrated citizens to their country of origin. In this article, we focus on Islam as a multi-dimensional binding mechanism. Religion is a broad register that links emotion, affect, and senses of belonging and binds individuals to political and cultural projects of collective actors and states. As we will demonstrate, it is a field in which both states and migrants have developed a variety of activities and initiatives, but it is difficult to single out what pertains to the state and what not. We argue that although state involvement in these two cases differs markedly, there are some intriguing parallels when we concentrate on religion. In both cases, religious affiliation is a very complex source of binding and of fission. State-monitored transnational networks have been tools of binding, but the same networks have engendered processes of disengagement from the state.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-420
Number of pages20
JournalContemporary Islam
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2016

Fingerprint

Morocco
state formation
Islam
Turkey
Religion
disengagement
denomination
country of origin
emotion
migrant
citizen
worker
Nation-building
Transnationalism

Keywords

  • Islam
  • Migration
  • Morocco
  • Transnationalism
  • Turkey

Cite this

Sunier, Thijl ; van der Linden, Heleen ; van de Bovenkamp, Ellen. / The long arm of the state? Transnationalism, Islam, and nation-building : the case of Turkey and Morocco. In: Contemporary Islam. 2016 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 401-420.
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The long arm of the state? Transnationalism, Islam, and nation-building : the case of Turkey and Morocco. / Sunier, Thijl; van der Linden, Heleen; van de Bovenkamp, Ellen.

In: Contemporary Islam, Vol. 10, No. 3, 01.09.2016, p. 401-420.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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