The multiplier effect: how the accumulation of cultural and social capital explains steep upward social mobility of children of low-educated immigrants

Maurice Crul, Jens Schneider, Elif Keskiner, Frans Lelie

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

We introduce what we have coined the multiplier effect. We explain the steep upward mobility of children of low-educated immigrants by studying how they overcome obstacles on their regular pathway, via alternative routes or through loopholes in the education and labour market system. The idea of the multiplier effect is that they virtually propel themselves forward in their careers. Essential is that each successful step forward offers new possibilities on which they build, thereby accumulating cultural and social capital and multiplying their chances of success. Initial small differences with their less successful co-ethnic peers generate an increasingly wider gap over time. Cultural and social capital theories primarily explain the reproduction of inequalities in society. The multiplier effect explains the breaking of the perpetual cycle of this reproduction, enabling steep upward mobility even when this group does not initially possess the right cultural and social capital to be successful.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321-338
Number of pages18
JournalEthnic and Racial Studies
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jan 2017

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Social Mobility
cultural capital
social capital
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Keywords

  • cultural and social capital theory
  • diversity
  • Elite formation
  • integration context theory
  • multiplier effect
  • social mobility

Cite this

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The multiplier effect : how the accumulation of cultural and social capital explains steep upward social mobility of children of low-educated immigrants. / Crul, Maurice; Schneider, Jens; Keskiner, Elif; Lelie, Frans.

In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, Vol. 40, No. 2, 26.01.2017, p. 321-338.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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