The northward shifting neophyte Tragopogon dubius is just as effective in forming mycorrhizal associations as the native T. pratensis

R.H.A. van Grunsven, T.-W. Yuwati, G.A. Kowalchuk, W.H. van der Putten, E.M. Veenendaal

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: As a consequence of climate warming, many organisms are shifting their range towards higher latitudes and altitudes. As not all do so at the same speed, this may disrupt biotic interaction. Release from natural enemies through range expansion can result in invasiveness, whereas loss of mutualists can reduce plant vigour and fitness. One of the most important groups of plant symbiotic mutualists is the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)533-539
JournalPlant Ecology and Diversity
Volume7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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