The occurrence of p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid in fossil plant materials and their use as UV-proxy.

P. Blokker, P. Boelen, R.A. Broekman

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The applicability of p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid concentrations or ratios in (sub)fossil plant remnant as UV-B proxies relies on various aspects, which are discussed in this paper and will be illustrated with some experimental data. A newly developed THM-micropyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was tested on various spores, pollen and other plant remains, which were analysed for the presence of the UV-absorbing compounds p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. This revealed that these supposed building-blocks of sporopollenin appear to be present in pollen of many plant species but also in moss spores. The development of this micropyrolysis method paved the way for the quantitative analysis of UV-absorbing compounds in case only a small amount of analyte is available, for example for fossil pollen and spores but also other small palynomorphs and plant fossils. The use of this technique will provide a better insight in the plant responses to UV-radiation, the chemistry of pollen and spores, their fossil counterparts and furthermore the means for a further development of a proxy for the reconstruction of past UV-B radiation. © Springer 2006.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-207
JournalPlant Ecology
Volume182
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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p-coumaric acid
ferulic acid
spore
pollen
fossils
spores
fossil
ultraviolet radiation
acid
moss
quantitative analysis
mosses and liverworts
plant response
gas chromatography
chemistry
mass spectrometry
methodology
material
radiation
method

Cite this

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title = "The occurrence of p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid in fossil plant materials and their use as UV-proxy.",
abstract = "The applicability of p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid concentrations or ratios in (sub)fossil plant remnant as UV-B proxies relies on various aspects, which are discussed in this paper and will be illustrated with some experimental data. A newly developed THM-micropyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was tested on various spores, pollen and other plant remains, which were analysed for the presence of the UV-absorbing compounds p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. This revealed that these supposed building-blocks of sporopollenin appear to be present in pollen of many plant species but also in moss spores. The development of this micropyrolysis method paved the way for the quantitative analysis of UV-absorbing compounds in case only a small amount of analyte is available, for example for fossil pollen and spores but also other small palynomorphs and plant fossils. The use of this technique will provide a better insight in the plant responses to UV-radiation, the chemistry of pollen and spores, their fossil counterparts and furthermore the means for a further development of a proxy for the reconstruction of past UV-B radiation. {\circledC} Springer 2006.",
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The occurrence of p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid in fossil plant materials and their use as UV-proxy. / Blokker, P.; Boelen, P.; Broekman, R.A.

In: Plant Ecology, Vol. 182, No. 1-2, 2006, p. 197-207.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The occurrence of p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid in fossil plant materials and their use as UV-proxy.

AU - Blokker, P.

AU - Boelen, P.

AU - Broekman, R.A.

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

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AB - The applicability of p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid concentrations or ratios in (sub)fossil plant remnant as UV-B proxies relies on various aspects, which are discussed in this paper and will be illustrated with some experimental data. A newly developed THM-micropyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was tested on various spores, pollen and other plant remains, which were analysed for the presence of the UV-absorbing compounds p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. This revealed that these supposed building-blocks of sporopollenin appear to be present in pollen of many plant species but also in moss spores. The development of this micropyrolysis method paved the way for the quantitative analysis of UV-absorbing compounds in case only a small amount of analyte is available, for example for fossil pollen and spores but also other small palynomorphs and plant fossils. The use of this technique will provide a better insight in the plant responses to UV-radiation, the chemistry of pollen and spores, their fossil counterparts and furthermore the means for a further development of a proxy for the reconstruction of past UV-B radiation. © Springer 2006.

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