The osteocyte as a novel key player in understanding periodontitis through its expression of RANKL and Sclerostin: a Review

T.J. de Vries, C. Huesa

Research output: Contribution to JournalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose of Review: Periodontitis is the inflammation-associated bone loss disease of the alveolar bone that surrounds teeth. Classically, the emphasis on the etiology of periodontitis has been on the products of periodontal pathogens that lead to an inflammatory response of the soft tissues of the periodontium, eventually leading to activation of osteoclasts that degrade the alveolar bone. Until recently, the response of osteocytes that populate the alveolar bone, and that are known for their regulatory role in bone anabolism and catabolism, has not been addressed.
Recent Findings: This review demonstrates that osteocytes play a key contributing role in periodontitis progression in various experimental mouse and rat periodontitis models. Osteocytes are the key expressing cells of both osteoclast differentiation factor RANKL as well as osteoblast activity regulator sclerostin. Targeted deletion of RANKL in osteocytes prevents osteoclast formation, thereby impairing periodontitis, despite the pressure of periodontitis-associated bacteria. Antibodies against the osteocyte-derived protein sclerostin inhibit and partially revert periodontitis by stimulating bone formation.
Summary: Experimental mouse and rat periodontitis models strongly indicate a key role for the bone-encapsulated osteocyte in understanding periodontitis etiology.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-121
JournalCurrent Osteoporosis Reports
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The osteocyte as a novel key player in understanding periodontitis through its expression of RANKL and Sclerostin: a Review'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this