The Paradox of Power Sharing: Participative Charismatic Leaders have Subordinates with more instead of less Need for Leadership

R.E. de Vries, R.D. Pathak, A.R. Paquin

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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    Abstract

    Although charismatic and participative leaders have been noted for their positive effects on criteria such as performance, job satisfaction, and commitment, few studies have looked at the relations with subordinates' leadership needs. In this study, the relations between charismatic and participative leadership, team outcomes, and a team's need for leadership were investigated. The sample consisted of South Pacific CEOs and their top-level management teams from Fiji, Tonga, Samoa, Vanuatu, and the Solomon Islands. Results showed that charismatic leadership was related to both group-level need for leadership and positive team outcomes. However, team outcomes did not mediate the relations between leadership and a team's need for leadership. Additionally, a moderator effect was found between participative leadership and charismatic leadership in explaining a team's need for leadership, implying that teams of subordinates with participative charismatic leaders need more instead of less leadership from their CEOs. © 2011 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)779-804
    JournalEuropean Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology
    Volume20
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

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