The reconciliation of fraternal twins: Organizing psychological and sociological approaches to ‘micro’ corporate social responsibility

J.-P. Gond, C. Moser

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Aguinis and Glavas’ (2012) call for developing corporate social responsibility (CSR) microfoundations has spurred a fast-growing field of empirical micro-CSR studies. Micro-CSR scholars share the common goal of providing CSR with microfoundations—i.e., foundations based on the individual actions and interactions underlying any CSR-related activity—and exploring the role of individuals in relation to CSR. However, the field remains highly fragmented. These scholars operate under the same ‘micro-CSR’ banner but approach their work from a range of disciplinary and methodological backgrounds and focus on different individual phenomena. This essay attempts to parse this category of research on individuals in micro-CSR into two distinct sub-fields: ‘psychological micro-CSR’ and ‘sociological micro-CSR’. We compare the fundamental orientations, empirical approaches, and distinct contributions of both fields of micro-CSR, explore the possibilities for cross-fertilization between these categories, and finally, suggest a way forward for future micro-CSR research that could exploit the complementarities and eliminate the common blind spots of both types of micro-CSR studies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-48
JournalHuman Relations
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019

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social responsibility
reconciliation
Organizing
Reconciliation
Psychological
Corporate Social Responsibility

Keywords

  • Corporate Social Responsibility
  • CSR
  • micro-CSR
  • microfoundations
  • organizational behavior
  • organizational theory

Cite this

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abstract = "Aguinis and Glavas’ (2012) call for developing corporate social responsibility (CSR) microfoundations has spurred a fast-growing field of empirical micro-CSR studies. Micro-CSR scholars share the common goal of providing CSR with microfoundations—i.e., foundations based on the individual actions and interactions underlying any CSR-related activity—and exploring the role of individuals in relation to CSR. However, the field remains highly fragmented. These scholars operate under the same ‘micro-CSR’ banner but approach their work from a range of disciplinary and methodological backgrounds and focus on different individual phenomena. This essay attempts to parse this category of research on individuals in micro-CSR into two distinct sub-fields: ‘psychological micro-CSR’ and ‘sociological micro-CSR’. We compare the fundamental orientations, empirical approaches, and distinct contributions of both fields of micro-CSR, explore the possibilities for cross-fertilization between these categories, and finally, suggest a way forward for future micro-CSR research that could exploit the complementarities and eliminate the common blind spots of both types of micro-CSR studies.",
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The reconciliation of fraternal twins: Organizing psychological and sociological approaches to ‘micro’ corporate social responsibility. / Gond, J.-P.; Moser, C.

In: Human Relations, 2019, p. 1-48.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Moser, C.

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