The relative utility of foraminifera and diatoms for reconstructing late Holocene relative sea-level change in North Carolina, USA

A.C. Kemp, B.P. Horton, R. Corbett, S.J. Culver, R.J. Edwards, O. van de Plassche

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Foraminifera and diatoms preserved in salt-marsh sediments have been used to produce high-resolution records of Holocene relative sea-level (RSL) change. To determine which of these microfossil groups is most appropriate for this purpose we investigated their relative utility from salt marshes in North Carolina, USA. Regional-scale transfer functions were developed using foraminifera, diatoms and a combination of both (multi-proxy) from three salt marshes (Oregon Inlet, Currituck Barrier Island and Pea Island). We evaluated each approach on the basis of transfer-function performance. Foraminifera, diatoms and multi-proxy-based transfer functions all demonstrated a strong relationship between observed and predicted elevations (r
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)9-21
    JournalQuaternary Research
    Volume71
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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