The role of anxiety in perceiving and realizing affordances

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    181 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Three experiments were conducted to examine the role of anxiety in perceiving and realizing affordances in wall climbing. Identical traverses were situated high and low on a climbing wall to manipulate anxiety. In Experiment 1, participants judged their maximal overhead reachability and performed maximal reaches on the climbing wall. Anxiety was found to reduce both perceived and actual maximal reaching height. In Experiment 2, participants climbed from right to left and back again on the high and low traverses, which now entailed an abundance of holds. Consistent with the reduction of perceived and actual maximal reaching height found in Experiment 1, anxiety led to the use of more holds. Finally, in Experiment 3, points of light were sequentially projected around the participants while they were climbing to measure attention. As participants detected fewer lights in the high-anxiety condition, it was concluded that anxiety narrowed attention. In general, the results underscored that the actor's emotional state plays an important role in perceiving and realizing affordances and that the perception of affordances changes as the accompanying action capabilities change. Copyright © 2006, Lawrence Krlbaum Associates, Inc.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)131-61
    JournalEcological Psychology
    Volume18
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The role of anxiety in perceiving and realizing affordances'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this