The role of feedback information for calibration and attunement in perceiving length by dynamic touch

R.G. Withagen, C.F. Michaels

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    Abstract

    Two processes have been hypothesized to underlie improvement in perception: attunement and calibration. These processes were examined in a dynamic touch paradigm in which participants were asked to report the lengths of unseen, wielded rods differing in length, diameter, and material. Two experiments addressed whether feedback informs about the need for reattunement and recalibration. Feedback indicating actual length induced both recalibration and reattunement. Recalibration did not occur when feedback indicated only whether 2 rods were of the same length or of different lengths. Such feedback, however, did induce reattunement. These results suggest that attunement and calibration are dissociable processes and that feedback informs which is needed. The observed change in variable use has implications also for research on what mechanical variables underlie length perception by dynamic touch. Copyright 2005 by the American Psychological Association.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1379-90
    JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
    Volume31
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

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