The role of two reading strategies in text comprehension: An eye fixation study in primary school children

M. van der Schoot, A.L. Vasbinder, T.M. Horsley, E.C.D.M. van Lieshout

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This study examined whether 10-12-year-old children use two reading strategies to aid their text comprehension: (1) distinguishing between important and unimportant words; and (2) resolving anaphoric references. Of interest was the question to what extent use of these reading strategies was predictive of reading comprehension skill over and above decoding skill and vocabulary. Reading strategy use was examined by the recording of eye fixations on specific target words. In contrast to less successful comprehenders, more successful comprehenders invested more processing time in important than in unimportant words. On the other hand, they needed less time to determine the antecedent of an anaphor. The results suggest that more successful comprehenders build a more effective mental model of the text than less successful comprehenders in at least two ways. First, they allocate more attention to the incorporation of goal-relevant than goal-irrelevant information into the model. Second, they ascertain that the text model is coherent and richly connected. © United Kingdom Literacy Association 2007.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-223
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Research in Reading
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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literacy
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title = "The role of two reading strategies in text comprehension: An eye fixation study in primary school children",
abstract = "This study examined whether 10-12-year-old children use two reading strategies to aid their text comprehension: (1) distinguishing between important and unimportant words; and (2) resolving anaphoric references. Of interest was the question to what extent use of these reading strategies was predictive of reading comprehension skill over and above decoding skill and vocabulary. Reading strategy use was examined by the recording of eye fixations on specific target words. In contrast to less successful comprehenders, more successful comprehenders invested more processing time in important than in unimportant words. On the other hand, they needed less time to determine the antecedent of an anaphor. The results suggest that more successful comprehenders build a more effective mental model of the text than less successful comprehenders in at least two ways. First, they allocate more attention to the incorporation of goal-relevant than goal-irrelevant information into the model. Second, they ascertain that the text model is coherent and richly connected. {\circledC} United Kingdom Literacy Association 2007.",
author = "{van der Schoot}, M. and A.L. Vasbinder and T.M. Horsley and {van Lieshout}, E.C.D.M.",
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The role of two reading strategies in text comprehension: An eye fixation study in primary school children. / van der Schoot, M.; Vasbinder, A.L.; Horsley, T.M.; van Lieshout, E.C.D.M.

In: Journal of Research in Reading, Vol. 31, No. 2, 2008, p. 203-223.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of two reading strategies in text comprehension: An eye fixation study in primary school children

AU - van der Schoot, M.

AU - Vasbinder, A.L.

AU - Horsley, T.M.

AU - van Lieshout, E.C.D.M.

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AB - This study examined whether 10-12-year-old children use two reading strategies to aid their text comprehension: (1) distinguishing between important and unimportant words; and (2) resolving anaphoric references. Of interest was the question to what extent use of these reading strategies was predictive of reading comprehension skill over and above decoding skill and vocabulary. Reading strategy use was examined by the recording of eye fixations on specific target words. In contrast to less successful comprehenders, more successful comprehenders invested more processing time in important than in unimportant words. On the other hand, they needed less time to determine the antecedent of an anaphor. The results suggest that more successful comprehenders build a more effective mental model of the text than less successful comprehenders in at least two ways. First, they allocate more attention to the incorporation of goal-relevant than goal-irrelevant information into the model. Second, they ascertain that the text model is coherent and richly connected. © United Kingdom Literacy Association 2007.

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