The significance of bidding, accepting and opponent modeling in automated negotiation

Tim Baarslag, Alexander Dirkzwager, Koen V. Hindriks, Catholijn M. Jonker

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Given the growing interest in automated negotiation, the search for effective strategies has produced a variety of different negotiation agents. Despite their diversity, there is a common structure to their design. A negotiation agent comprises three key components: the bidding strategy, the opponent model and the acceptance criteria. We show that this three-component view of a negotiating architecture not only provides a useful basis for developing such agents but also provides a useful analytical tool. By combining these components in varying ways, we are able to demonstrate the contribution of each component to the overall negotiation result, and thus determine the key contributing components. Moreover, we study the interaction between components and present detailed interaction effects. Furthermore, we find that the bidding strategy in particular is of critical importance to the negotiator's success and far exceeds the importance of opponent preference modeling techniques. Our results contribute to the shaping of a research agenda for negotiating agent design by providing guidelines on how agent developers can spend their time most effectively.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationECAI 2014 - 21st European Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Including Prestigious Applications of Intelligent Systems, PAIS 2014, Proceedings
EditorsTorsten Schaub, Gerhard Friedrich, Barry O'Sullivan
PublisherIOS Press
Pages27-32
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781614994183
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event21st European Conference on Artificial Intelligence, ECAI 2014 - Prague, Czech Republic
Duration: 18 Aug 201422 Aug 2014

Publication series

NameFrontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications
Volume263
ISSN (Print)0922-6389

Conference

Conference21st European Conference on Artificial Intelligence, ECAI 2014
CountryCzech Republic
CityPrague
Period18/08/1422/08/14

Cite this

Baarslag, T., Dirkzwager, A., Hindriks, K. V., & Jonker, C. M. (2014). The significance of bidding, accepting and opponent modeling in automated negotiation. In T. Schaub, G. Friedrich, & B. O'Sullivan (Eds.), ECAI 2014 - 21st European Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Including Prestigious Applications of Intelligent Systems, PAIS 2014, Proceedings (pp. 27-32). (Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications; Vol. 263). IOS Press. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-419-0-27
Baarslag, Tim ; Dirkzwager, Alexander ; Hindriks, Koen V. ; Jonker, Catholijn M. / The significance of bidding, accepting and opponent modeling in automated negotiation. ECAI 2014 - 21st European Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Including Prestigious Applications of Intelligent Systems, PAIS 2014, Proceedings. editor / Torsten Schaub ; Gerhard Friedrich ; Barry O'Sullivan. IOS Press, 2014. pp. 27-32 (Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications).
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Baarslag, T, Dirkzwager, A, Hindriks, KV & Jonker, CM 2014, The significance of bidding, accepting and opponent modeling in automated negotiation. in T Schaub, G Friedrich & B O'Sullivan (eds), ECAI 2014 - 21st European Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Including Prestigious Applications of Intelligent Systems, PAIS 2014, Proceedings. Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications, vol. 263, IOS Press, pp. 27-32, 21st European Conference on Artificial Intelligence, ECAI 2014, Prague, Czech Republic, 18/08/14. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-419-0-27

The significance of bidding, accepting and opponent modeling in automated negotiation. / Baarslag, Tim; Dirkzwager, Alexander; Hindriks, Koen V.; Jonker, Catholijn M.

ECAI 2014 - 21st European Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Including Prestigious Applications of Intelligent Systems, PAIS 2014, Proceedings. ed. / Torsten Schaub; Gerhard Friedrich; Barry O'Sullivan. IOS Press, 2014. p. 27-32 (Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications; Vol. 263).

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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Baarslag T, Dirkzwager A, Hindriks KV, Jonker CM. The significance of bidding, accepting and opponent modeling in automated negotiation. In Schaub T, Friedrich G, O'Sullivan B, editors, ECAI 2014 - 21st European Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Including Prestigious Applications of Intelligent Systems, PAIS 2014, Proceedings. IOS Press. 2014. p. 27-32. (Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications). https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-61499-419-0-27