Time-resolved fluorescence measurements on leaves: principles and recent developments

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Photosynthesis starts when a pigment in the photosynthetic antennae absorbs a photon. The electronic excitation energy is then transferred through the network of light-harvesting pigments to special chlorophyll (Chl) molecules in the reaction centres, where electron transfer is initiated. Energy transfer and primary electron transfer processes take place on timescales ranging from femtoseconds to nanoseconds, and can be monitored in real time via time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. This method is widely used for measurements on unicellular photosynthetic organisms, isolated photosynthetic membranes, and individual complexes. Measurements on intact leaves remain a challenge due to their high structural heterogeneity, high scattering, and high optical density, which can lead to optical artefacts. However, detailed information on the dynamics of these early steps, and the underlying structure–function relationships, is highly informative and urgently required in order to get deeper insights into the physiological regulation mechanisms of primary photosynthesis. Here, we describe a current methodology of time-resolved fluorescence measurements on intact leaves in the picosecond to nanosecond time range. Principles of fluorescence measurements on intact leaves, possible sources of alterations of fluorescence kinetics and the ways to overcome them are addressed. We also describe how our understanding of the organisation and function of photosynthetic proteins and energy flow dynamics in intact leaves can be enriched through the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on leaves. For that, an example of a measurement on Zea mays leaves is presented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)355-369
Number of pages15
JournalPhotosynthesis Research
Volume140
Issue number3
Early online date26 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

Fingerprint

Fluorescence
fluorescence
fluorescence emission spectroscopy
Photosynthesis
Fluorescence Spectrometry
Fluorescence spectroscopy
leaves
Pigments
Photosynthetic membranes
electron transfer
Electrons
pigments
photosynthesis
Density (optical)
Excitation energy
Energy Transfer
physiological regulation
Chlorophyll
Photons
energy flow

Keywords

  • Fluorescence
  • Leaf
  • Re-absorption
  • Time-resolved spectroscopy

Cite this

@article{aa506a3f4b97411aa0648b9a6fc0c87a,
title = "Time-resolved fluorescence measurements on leaves: principles and recent developments",
abstract = "Photosynthesis starts when a pigment in the photosynthetic antennae absorbs a photon. The electronic excitation energy is then transferred through the network of light-harvesting pigments to special chlorophyll (Chl) molecules in the reaction centres, where electron transfer is initiated. Energy transfer and primary electron transfer processes take place on timescales ranging from femtoseconds to nanoseconds, and can be monitored in real time via time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. This method is widely used for measurements on unicellular photosynthetic organisms, isolated photosynthetic membranes, and individual complexes. Measurements on intact leaves remain a challenge due to their high structural heterogeneity, high scattering, and high optical density, which can lead to optical artefacts. However, detailed information on the dynamics of these early steps, and the underlying structure–function relationships, is highly informative and urgently required in order to get deeper insights into the physiological regulation mechanisms of primary photosynthesis. Here, we describe a current methodology of time-resolved fluorescence measurements on intact leaves in the picosecond to nanosecond time range. Principles of fluorescence measurements on intact leaves, possible sources of alterations of fluorescence kinetics and the ways to overcome them are addressed. We also describe how our understanding of the organisation and function of photosynthetic proteins and energy flow dynamics in intact leaves can be enriched through the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on leaves. For that, an example of a measurement on Zea mays leaves is presented.",
keywords = "Fluorescence, Leaf, Re-absorption, Time-resolved spectroscopy",
author = "Chukhutsina, {Volha U.} and Holzwarth, {Alfred R.} and Roberta Croce",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1007/s11120-018-0607-8",
language = "English",
volume = "140",
pages = "355--369",
journal = "Photosynthesis Research",
issn = "0166-8595",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "3",

}

Time-resolved fluorescence measurements on leaves : principles and recent developments. / Chukhutsina, Volha U.; Holzwarth, Alfred R.; Croce, Roberta.

In: Photosynthesis Research, Vol. 140, No. 3, 06.2019, p. 355-369.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Time-resolved fluorescence measurements on leaves

T2 - principles and recent developments

AU - Chukhutsina, Volha U.

AU - Holzwarth, Alfred R.

AU - Croce, Roberta

PY - 2019/6

Y1 - 2019/6

N2 - Photosynthesis starts when a pigment in the photosynthetic antennae absorbs a photon. The electronic excitation energy is then transferred through the network of light-harvesting pigments to special chlorophyll (Chl) molecules in the reaction centres, where electron transfer is initiated. Energy transfer and primary electron transfer processes take place on timescales ranging from femtoseconds to nanoseconds, and can be monitored in real time via time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. This method is widely used for measurements on unicellular photosynthetic organisms, isolated photosynthetic membranes, and individual complexes. Measurements on intact leaves remain a challenge due to their high structural heterogeneity, high scattering, and high optical density, which can lead to optical artefacts. However, detailed information on the dynamics of these early steps, and the underlying structure–function relationships, is highly informative and urgently required in order to get deeper insights into the physiological regulation mechanisms of primary photosynthesis. Here, we describe a current methodology of time-resolved fluorescence measurements on intact leaves in the picosecond to nanosecond time range. Principles of fluorescence measurements on intact leaves, possible sources of alterations of fluorescence kinetics and the ways to overcome them are addressed. We also describe how our understanding of the organisation and function of photosynthetic proteins and energy flow dynamics in intact leaves can be enriched through the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on leaves. For that, an example of a measurement on Zea mays leaves is presented.

AB - Photosynthesis starts when a pigment in the photosynthetic antennae absorbs a photon. The electronic excitation energy is then transferred through the network of light-harvesting pigments to special chlorophyll (Chl) molecules in the reaction centres, where electron transfer is initiated. Energy transfer and primary electron transfer processes take place on timescales ranging from femtoseconds to nanoseconds, and can be monitored in real time via time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. This method is widely used for measurements on unicellular photosynthetic organisms, isolated photosynthetic membranes, and individual complexes. Measurements on intact leaves remain a challenge due to their high structural heterogeneity, high scattering, and high optical density, which can lead to optical artefacts. However, detailed information on the dynamics of these early steps, and the underlying structure–function relationships, is highly informative and urgently required in order to get deeper insights into the physiological regulation mechanisms of primary photosynthesis. Here, we describe a current methodology of time-resolved fluorescence measurements on intact leaves in the picosecond to nanosecond time range. Principles of fluorescence measurements on intact leaves, possible sources of alterations of fluorescence kinetics and the ways to overcome them are addressed. We also describe how our understanding of the organisation and function of photosynthetic proteins and energy flow dynamics in intact leaves can be enriched through the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on leaves. For that, an example of a measurement on Zea mays leaves is presented.

KW - Fluorescence

KW - Leaf

KW - Re-absorption

KW - Time-resolved spectroscopy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85057563546&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85057563546&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11120-018-0607-8

DO - 10.1007/s11120-018-0607-8

M3 - Article

VL - 140

SP - 355

EP - 369

JO - Photosynthesis Research

JF - Photosynthesis Research

SN - 0166-8595

IS - 3

ER -