To give or not to give, that's the question: How methodology is destiny in Dutch giving data

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

In research on giving, methodology is destiny. The volume of donations estimated from sample surveys strongly depends on the length of the questionnaire used to measure giving. By comparing two giving surveys from the Netherlands, the authors show that a short questionnaire on giving not only underestimates the volume of giving but also biases the effects of predictors of giving. Specifically, they find that a very short module leads to an underestimation of the effects of predictors of giving on the amount donated but an overestimation of their effects on the probability of charitable giving. Short survey modules may lead researchers to falsely reject or accept hypotheses on determinants of giving due to underreporting of donations. © 2006 Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action.
LanguageEnglish
Pages533-540
Number of pages8
JournalNonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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title = "To give or not to give, that's the question: How methodology is destiny in Dutch giving data",
abstract = "In research on giving, methodology is destiny. The volume of donations estimated from sample surveys strongly depends on the length of the questionnaire used to measure giving. By comparing two giving surveys from the Netherlands, the authors show that a short questionnaire on giving not only underestimates the volume of giving but also biases the effects of predictors of giving. Specifically, they find that a very short module leads to an underestimation of the effects of predictors of giving on the amount donated but an overestimation of their effects on the probability of charitable giving. Short survey modules may lead researchers to falsely reject or accept hypotheses on determinants of giving due to underreporting of donations. {\circledC} 2006 Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action.",
author = "R.H.F.P. Bekkers and P. Wiepking",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1177/0899764006288286",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "533--540",
journal = "Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly",
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publisher = "Sage Publications",
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}

To give or not to give, that's the question: How methodology is destiny in Dutch giving data. / Bekkers, R.H.F.P.; Wiepking, P.

In: Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Vol. 35, No. 3, 2006, p. 533-540.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Bekkers, R.H.F.P.

AU - Wiepking, P.

PY - 2006

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AB - In research on giving, methodology is destiny. The volume of donations estimated from sample surveys strongly depends on the length of the questionnaire used to measure giving. By comparing two giving surveys from the Netherlands, the authors show that a short questionnaire on giving not only underestimates the volume of giving but also biases the effects of predictors of giving. Specifically, they find that a very short module leads to an underestimation of the effects of predictors of giving on the amount donated but an overestimation of their effects on the probability of charitable giving. Short survey modules may lead researchers to falsely reject or accept hypotheses on determinants of giving due to underreporting of donations. © 2006 Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action.

U2 - 10.1177/0899764006288286

DO - 10.1177/0899764006288286

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T2 - Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly

JF - Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly

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