Trace analysis of 3-hydroxy benzo[a]pyrene in urine for the biomonitoring of human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

Freek Ariese*, Gerard P. Hoornweg, Ronald J. Van De Nesse, Swanette R. Jukema-Leenstra, Johannes W. Hofstraat, Cees Gooijer, Nel H. Velthorst

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Determination of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) metabolites in urine can provide direct insight into recent exposure to BaP integrated from all uptake routes. In order to detect 3-OH BaP in human urine after exposure to BaP at the workplace, extremely sensitive methods need to be developed. In this paper, a new extraction method is presented, and two laserbased fluorescence techniques are evaluated. Using HPLC with laser-induced fluorescence detection, a detection limit of 8 ng/L was obtained. With laser-excited Shpol'skii spectrometry after chemical derivatization, 3-OH BaP could be detected at even a 0.5-ng/L concentration. In a pilot study, urine samples from coke-oven workers and from occupationally nonexposed control persons were analyzed. In the control samples, the average 3-OH BaP concentration was 8.3 ng/L; the 3-OH BaP concentrations were found to be highly correlated (r2 = 0.89) with urinary 1-OH pyrene, a widely used biomarker for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure. Significantly elevated 1-OH pyrene concentrations were measured in urine samples from coke-oven workers, but in most samples a corresponding increase of 3-OH BaP was not observed. Possible explanations for this discrepancy are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-204
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Analytical Toxicology
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

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