Transfrontier conservation in southern Africa: Taking down the fences or returning to the barriers?

M.J. Spierenburg, H. Wels

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFencing Impacts: A review of the environmental, social and economic impacts of game and veterinary fencing in Africa with particular reference to the Great Limpopo and Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Areas
EditorsK. Ferguson, J. Hanks
Place of PublicationPretoria
PublisherMammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria
Pages26-36
Number of pages325
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Cite this

Spierenburg, M. J., & Wels, H. (2010). Transfrontier conservation in southern Africa: Taking down the fences or returning to the barriers? In K. Ferguson, & J. Hanks (Eds.), Fencing Impacts: A review of the environmental, social and economic impacts of game and veterinary fencing in Africa with particular reference to the Great Limpopo and Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Areas (pp. 26-36). Pretoria: Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria.
Spierenburg, M.J. ; Wels, H. / Transfrontier conservation in southern Africa: Taking down the fences or returning to the barriers?. Fencing Impacts: A review of the environmental, social and economic impacts of game and veterinary fencing in Africa with particular reference to the Great Limpopo and Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Areas. editor / K. Ferguson ; J. Hanks. Pretoria : Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria, 2010. pp. 26-36
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Spierenburg, MJ & Wels, H 2010, Transfrontier conservation in southern Africa: Taking down the fences or returning to the barriers? in K Ferguson & J Hanks (eds), Fencing Impacts: A review of the environmental, social and economic impacts of game and veterinary fencing in Africa with particular reference to the Great Limpopo and Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Areas. Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, pp. 26-36.

Transfrontier conservation in southern Africa: Taking down the fences or returning to the barriers? / Spierenburg, M.J.; Wels, H.

Fencing Impacts: A review of the environmental, social and economic impacts of game and veterinary fencing in Africa with particular reference to the Great Limpopo and Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Areas. ed. / K. Ferguson; J. Hanks. Pretoria : Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria, 2010. p. 26-36.

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

TY - CHAP

T1 - Transfrontier conservation in southern Africa: Taking down the fences or returning to the barriers?

AU - Spierenburg, M.J.

AU - Wels, H.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

M3 - Chapter

SP - 26

EP - 36

BT - Fencing Impacts: A review of the environmental, social and economic impacts of game and veterinary fencing in Africa with particular reference to the Great Limpopo and Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Areas

A2 - Ferguson, K.

A2 - Hanks, J.

PB - Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria

CY - Pretoria

ER -

Spierenburg MJ, Wels H. Transfrontier conservation in southern Africa: Taking down the fences or returning to the barriers? In Ferguson K, Hanks J, editors, Fencing Impacts: A review of the environmental, social and economic impacts of game and veterinary fencing in Africa with particular reference to the Great Limpopo and Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Areas. Pretoria: Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria. 2010. p. 26-36