Trust and distrust as distinct concepts: Why studying distrust in institutions is important

S. Van de Walle, F.E. Six

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Scholarship of trust in institutions has tended to see trust and distrust as opposites on one continuum. Theoretical advances have challenged this view and now consider trust and distrust as different constructs, and thus as constructs with different characteristics and partly different determinants. Current empirical research on trust in government has so far done little to incorporate these findings, and has largely continued to rely on traditional survey items assuming a trust-distrust continuum. We rely on the literature in organization studies and political science to argue in favour of measuring citizen trust and distrust as distinct concepts and discuss future research challenges. © 2014 © 2013 The Editor, Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis: Research and Practice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-174
JournalJournal of Comparative Policy Analysis
Volume16
Issue number2
Early online date23 Apr 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

political science
empirical research
editor
determinants
citizen
organization
literature

Cite this

@article{567fc48d6da247c58f4aa358ab70b136,
title = "Trust and distrust as distinct concepts: Why studying distrust in institutions is important",
abstract = "Scholarship of trust in institutions has tended to see trust and distrust as opposites on one continuum. Theoretical advances have challenged this view and now consider trust and distrust as different constructs, and thus as constructs with different characteristics and partly different determinants. Current empirical research on trust in government has so far done little to incorporate these findings, and has largely continued to rely on traditional survey items assuming a trust-distrust continuum. We rely on the literature in organization studies and political science to argue in favour of measuring citizen trust and distrust as distinct concepts and discuss future research challenges. {\circledC} 2014 {\circledC} 2013 The Editor, Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis: Research and Practice.",
author = "{Van de Walle}, S. and F.E. Six",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1080/13876988.2013.785146",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "158--174",
journal = "Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis",
issn = "1387-6988",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

Trust and distrust as distinct concepts: Why studying distrust in institutions is important. / Van de Walle, S.; Six, F.E.

In: Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis, Vol. 16, No. 2, 2014, p. 158-174.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trust and distrust as distinct concepts: Why studying distrust in institutions is important

AU - Van de Walle, S.

AU - Six, F.E.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Scholarship of trust in institutions has tended to see trust and distrust as opposites on one continuum. Theoretical advances have challenged this view and now consider trust and distrust as different constructs, and thus as constructs with different characteristics and partly different determinants. Current empirical research on trust in government has so far done little to incorporate these findings, and has largely continued to rely on traditional survey items assuming a trust-distrust continuum. We rely on the literature in organization studies and political science to argue in favour of measuring citizen trust and distrust as distinct concepts and discuss future research challenges. © 2014 © 2013 The Editor, Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis: Research and Practice.

AB - Scholarship of trust in institutions has tended to see trust and distrust as opposites on one continuum. Theoretical advances have challenged this view and now consider trust and distrust as different constructs, and thus as constructs with different characteristics and partly different determinants. Current empirical research on trust in government has so far done little to incorporate these findings, and has largely continued to rely on traditional survey items assuming a trust-distrust continuum. We rely on the literature in organization studies and political science to argue in favour of measuring citizen trust and distrust as distinct concepts and discuss future research challenges. © 2014 © 2013 The Editor, Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis: Research and Practice.

U2 - 10.1080/13876988.2013.785146

DO - 10.1080/13876988.2013.785146

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 158

EP - 174

JO - Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis

JF - Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis

SN - 1387-6988

IS - 2

ER -