Trust in the employer: the role of high-involvement work practices and procedural justice in European organizations

R. Searle, D.N. Den Hartog, A. Weibel, N. Gillespie, F.E. Six, T. Hatzakis, D. Skinner

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Despite the central role of trust in the organizational sciences, we know little about what makes people trust the organizations they work for. This paper examines the antecedents of employees' trust in their organizations drawing on survey data from over 600 European professional workers and managers. The results revealed direct as well as indirect relationships of both human resource (HR) practices and procedural justice with trust. The relationships of both HR practices and procedural justice with trust were partially mediated by perceptions of organizational trustworthiness (in terms of perceived ability and trustworthy intentions of the organization). Justice and HR practices were also found to interact such that justice forms a stronger predictor of trust in organizations when HR practices are less developed. In addition, employees' dispositional propensity to trust explained significant variance in employee trust in their organization, even when it was controlled in our analysis. The implications of these findings for research and practice are discussed. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1069-1092
JournalInternational Journal of Human Resource Management
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Personnel
Human resource practices
Procedural justice
Employers
Work practices
Managers
Employees
Justice
Propensity
Survey data
Work organization
Trustworthiness
Predictors
Workers

Cite this

Searle, R. ; Den Hartog, D.N. ; Weibel, A. ; Gillespie, N. ; Six, F.E. ; Hatzakis, T. ; Skinner, D. / Trust in the employer: the role of high-involvement work practices and procedural justice in European organizations. In: International Journal of Human Resource Management. 2011 ; Vol. 22, No. 5. pp. 1069-1092.
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Trust in the employer: the role of high-involvement work practices and procedural justice in European organizations. / Searle, R.; Den Hartog, D.N.; Weibel, A.; Gillespie, N.; Six, F.E.; Hatzakis, T.; Skinner, D.

In: International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 22, No. 5, 2011, p. 1069-1092.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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