Generalized Trust Through Civic Engagement? Evidence from Five National Panel Studies

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

According to a popular version of social capital theory, civic engagement should produce generalized trust among citizens. We put this theory to the test by examining the causal connection between civic engagement and generalized trust using multiple methods and multiple (prospective) panel datasets. We found participants to be more trusting. This was mostly likely caused by selection effects: the causal effects of civic engagement on trust were very small or nonsignificant. In the cases where small causal effects were found, they turned out not to last. We found no differences across types of organizations and only minor variations across countries.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-294
Number of pages18
JournalPolitical Psychology
Volume36
Issue number3
Early online date2 Dec 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

evidence
type of organization
social capital
Organizations
citizen
Civic Engagement
Causal
Datasets
Social Capital
Social Theory

Keywords

  • Membership
  • Social trust
  • Voluntary associations
  • Volunteering

Cite this

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abstract = "According to a popular version of social capital theory, civic engagement should produce generalized trust among citizens. We put this theory to the test by examining the causal connection between civic engagement and generalized trust using multiple methods and multiple (prospective) panel datasets. We found participants to be more trusting. This was mostly likely caused by selection effects: the causal effects of civic engagement on trust were very small or nonsignificant. In the cases where small causal effects were found, they turned out not to last. We found no differences across types of organizations and only minor variations across countries.",
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Generalized Trust Through Civic Engagement? Evidence from Five National Panel Studies. / van Ingen, Erik; Bekkers, René.

In: Political Psychology, Vol. 36, No. 3, 2015, p. 277-294.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AB - According to a popular version of social capital theory, civic engagement should produce generalized trust among citizens. We put this theory to the test by examining the causal connection between civic engagement and generalized trust using multiple methods and multiple (prospective) panel datasets. We found participants to be more trusting. This was mostly likely caused by selection effects: the causal effects of civic engagement on trust were very small or nonsignificant. In the cases where small causal effects were found, they turned out not to last. We found no differences across types of organizations and only minor variations across countries.

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