Understanding different positions on female genital cutting among Maasai and Samburu communities in Kenya: A cultural psychological perspective

Ernst Graamans*, Peter Ofware, Peter Nguura, Eefje Smet, Wouter ten Have

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This paper presents an analysis of different positions on female genital cutting, either legitimising the practice or challenging it. The framework it offers has been developed from cultural psychological theory and qualitative data collected in Maasai communities around Loitokitok and Magadi, Kajiado County, and Samburu communities around Wamba, Samburu County, in Kenya. Over the course of one month, 94 respondents were interviewed using maximum variation sampling. Triangulation took place by means of participant observation of significant events, such as alternative rites, participation in daily activities and informal talks while staying at traditional homesteads and kraals. The framework adds to understanding of why more contextual approaches and holistic interventions are required to bring an end to female genital cutting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-94
Number of pages15
JournalCulture, Health and Sexuality
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • change intervention
  • cultural practices
  • Female genital cutting
  • group belonging
  • Kenya

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