Understanding the autonomy–meaningful work relationship in nursing: A theoretical framework

Jitske M.C. Both-Nwabuwe, Marjolein Lips-Wiersma, Maria T.M. Dijkstra, Bianca Beersma

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Within nursing literature, the value and contribution of autonomy to nurse work satisfaction has been consistently demonstrated. Given the current forms of work and today's technology, the scope of freedom a nurse has over and in work has expanded in many different ways. However, although autonomy is viewed as an important antecedent to meaningful work (MW), no formal theory exists attempting to explain the relationships between the various different forms of autonomy and MW. Such a theoretical framework would guide health care organizations to direct resources specifically toward those types of autonomy that are most likely to cultivate the MW and its associated outcomes such as job satisfaction. Purpose: To address this important gap, this article introduces a theoretical, empirically testable model of autonomy—MW that is suitable for the contemporary work environment of nurses. Method: Drawing from research and theory in nursing literature, organizational sciences, and business ethics on autonomy and MW, the model is presented in four parts: the proposed relationships between perceived (1) professional autonomy, (2) individual autonomy, (3) group autonomy with core dimensions of MW, and (4) the proposed relationships between these three forms of autonomy with the dimensions “inspiration” and “facing reality.” Findings: By using a multidimensional MW construct, our model offers fine-tuned propositions regarding how different types of autonomy influence different dimensions of MW. Discussion: The model proposes that the three forms of autonomy relate differently to the dimensions of MW. This model can be used as starting point for empirical research on autonomy–MW relationships.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNursing Outlook
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Nursing
Job Satisfaction
Nurses
Business Ethics
Institutional Ethics
Professional Autonomy
Nursing Theory
Empirical Research
Organizations
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
Research

Keywords

  • CMWS
  • Individual autonomy
  • Meaningful work
  • Nursing
  • Perceived group autonomy
  • Professional autonomy

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Within nursing literature, the value and contribution of autonomy to nurse work satisfaction has been consistently demonstrated. Given the current forms of work and today's technology, the scope of freedom a nurse has over and in work has expanded in many different ways. However, although autonomy is viewed as an important antecedent to meaningful work (MW), no formal theory exists attempting to explain the relationships between the various different forms of autonomy and MW. Such a theoretical framework would guide health care organizations to direct resources specifically toward those types of autonomy that are most likely to cultivate the MW and its associated outcomes such as job satisfaction. Purpose: To address this important gap, this article introduces a theoretical, empirically testable model of autonomy—MW that is suitable for the contemporary work environment of nurses. Method: Drawing from research and theory in nursing literature, organizational sciences, and business ethics on autonomy and MW, the model is presented in four parts: the proposed relationships between perceived (1) professional autonomy, (2) individual autonomy, (3) group autonomy with core dimensions of MW, and (4) the proposed relationships between these three forms of autonomy with the dimensions “inspiration” and “facing reality.” Findings: By using a multidimensional MW construct, our model offers fine-tuned propositions regarding how different types of autonomy influence different dimensions of MW. Discussion: The model proposes that the three forms of autonomy relate differently to the dimensions of MW. This model can be used as starting point for empirical research on autonomy–MW relationships.",
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Understanding the autonomy–meaningful work relationship in nursing : A theoretical framework. / Both-Nwabuwe, Jitske M.C.; Lips-Wiersma, Marjolein; Dijkstra, Maria T.M.; Beersma, Bianca.

In: Nursing Outlook, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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