Unmet supportive care needs in patients treated with total laryngectomy and its associated factors

Femke Jansen, Simone Elisabeth Jacoba Eerenstein, Birgit Ilja Lissenberg-Witte, Cornelia Foekje van Uden-Kraan, Charles René Leemans, Irma Maria Verdonck de Leeuw*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate unmet supportive care needs in patients treated with total laryngectomy and its associated factors.

METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 283 patients who underwent total laryngectomy completed questions on supportive care needs (Supportive Care Needs Survey [SCNS]). Median time since total laryngectomy surgery was 7 years (range 0-37 years). The prevalence of unmet supportive care needs and its associated factors were investigated using logistic regression analyses.

RESULTS: Unmet supportive care needs were highest for the head and neck cancer-specific functioning domain (53%), followed by the psychological (39%), physical and daily living (37%), health system, information, and patient support (35%), sexuality (23%), and lifestyle (5%) domains. Seventy-one percent reported at least one low, moderate, or high unmet need. Female sex, living alone, and having a voice prosthesis were positively associated with unmet needs on 1 domain (P < .05). A worse health-related quality of life was associated with unmet needs on all domains.

CONCLUSION: The majority of patients who underwent total laryngectomy report at least one low, moderate, or high unmet supportive care need.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2633-2641
Number of pages9
JournalHead and Neck
Volume40
Issue number12
Early online date21 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2018

Keywords

  • head and neck cancer
  • laryngeal cancer
  • quality of life
  • supportive care needs
  • total laryngectomy

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