Untangling the effects of partner responsiveness on health and well-being: The role of perceived control

M. Alonso-Ferres, L. Imami, R.B. Slatcher

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

© The Author(s) 2019.Perceived partner responsiveness (PPR)—the extent to which people feel understood, cared for, and appreciated—has been identified as an organizing principle in the study of close relationships. Previous work indicates that PPR may benefit physical health and well-being, but how PPR is associated with personal benefits is less clear. One cognitive mechanism that may help to explain these associations is perceived control. Here we tested two competing models (moderation vs. mediation) in which we assessed whether perceived control might explain how PPR impacts health, well-being, and mortality in a 20-year longitudinal study of adults (N = 1,186). We found that PPR has a long-term positive association with health, well-being, and mortality via increased perceived control and, in turn, decreased negative affect reactivity to daily stressors. These findings have important implications for understanding the cognitive mechanisms that link PPR to health and well-being.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1150-1171
JournalJournal of Social and Personal Relationships
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2020
Externally publishedYes

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