Using Mind Maps to Make Student Questioning Effective: Learning Outcomes of a Principle-Based Scenario for Teacher Guidance

Harry Stokhof*, Bregje de Vries, Theo Bastiaens, Rob Martens

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Student questioning is an important learning strategy, but rare in many classrooms, because teachers have concerns if these questions contribute to attaining curricular objectives. Teachers face the challenge of making student questioning effective for learning the curriculum. To address this challenge, a principle-based scenario for guiding effective student questioning was developed and tested for its relevance and practicality in two previous studies. In the scenario, which consists of a sequence of pedagogical activities, mind maps support teachers and students to explore and elaborate upon a core curriculum, by raising, investigating, and exchanging student questions. In this paper, a follow-up study is presented that tested the effectiveness of the scenario on student outcomes in terms of attainment of curricular objectives. Ten teachers and their 231 students participated in the study. Pre- and posttest mind maps were used to measure individual and collective learning outcomes of student questioning. Findings show that a majority of students progressed in learning the core curriculum and elaborated upon it. The findings suggest that visualizing knowledge construction in a shared mind map supports students to learn a core curriculum and to refine their knowledge structures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-23
Number of pages23
JournalResearch in Science Education
Volume2018
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • Core curriculum
  • Inquiry-based learning
  • Mind map assessment
  • Student questioning
  • Teacher guidance

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