Walk to me when I smile, step back when I'm angry: emotional faces modulate whole-body approach-avoidance behaviors

J.F. Stins, K. Roelofs, J. Villan, K. Kooijman, M.A. Hagenaars, P.J. Beek

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Facial expressions are potent social cues that can induce behavioral dispositions, such as approach-avoidance tendencies. We studied these tendencies by asking participants to make whole-body forward (approach) or backward (avoidance) steps on a force plate in response to the valence of social cues (happy or angry faces) under affect-congruent and incongruent mappings. Posturographic parameters of the steps related to automatic stimulus evaluation, step initiation (reaction time), and step execution were determined and analyzed as a function of stimulus valence and stimulus-response mapping. The main result was that participants needed more time to initiate a forward step towards an angry face than towards a smiling face (which is evidence of a congruency effect), but with backward steps, this difference failed to reach significance. We also found a reduction in spontaneous body sway prior to the step with the incongruent mapping. The results provide a crucial empirical link between theories of socially induced action tendencies and theories of postural control and suggest a motoric basis for socially guided motivated behavior. © 2011 The Author(s).
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)603-611
    Number of pages9
    JournalExperimental Brain Research
    Volume212
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

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    Avoidance Learning
    Cues
    Smiling
    Facial Expression
    Reaction Time

    Cite this

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    title = "Walk to me when I smile, step back when I'm angry: emotional faces modulate whole-body approach-avoidance behaviors",
    abstract = "Facial expressions are potent social cues that can induce behavioral dispositions, such as approach-avoidance tendencies. We studied these tendencies by asking participants to make whole-body forward (approach) or backward (avoidance) steps on a force plate in response to the valence of social cues (happy or angry faces) under affect-congruent and incongruent mappings. Posturographic parameters of the steps related to automatic stimulus evaluation, step initiation (reaction time), and step execution were determined and analyzed as a function of stimulus valence and stimulus-response mapping. The main result was that participants needed more time to initiate a forward step towards an angry face than towards a smiling face (which is evidence of a congruency effect), but with backward steps, this difference failed to reach significance. We also found a reduction in spontaneous body sway prior to the step with the incongruent mapping. The results provide a crucial empirical link between theories of socially induced action tendencies and theories of postural control and suggest a motoric basis for socially guided motivated behavior. {\circledC} 2011 The Author(s).",
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    language = "English",
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    Walk to me when I smile, step back when I'm angry: emotional faces modulate whole-body approach-avoidance behaviors. / Stins, J.F.; Roelofs, K.; Villan, J.; Kooijman, K.; Hagenaars, M.A.; Beek, P.J.

    In: Experimental Brain Research, Vol. 212, No. 4, 2011, p. 603-611.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Walk to me when I smile, step back when I'm angry: emotional faces modulate whole-body approach-avoidance behaviors

    AU - Stins, J.F.

    AU - Roelofs, K.

    AU - Villan, J.

    AU - Kooijman, K.

    AU - Hagenaars, M.A.

    AU - Beek, P.J.

    PY - 2011

    Y1 - 2011

    N2 - Facial expressions are potent social cues that can induce behavioral dispositions, such as approach-avoidance tendencies. We studied these tendencies by asking participants to make whole-body forward (approach) or backward (avoidance) steps on a force plate in response to the valence of social cues (happy or angry faces) under affect-congruent and incongruent mappings. Posturographic parameters of the steps related to automatic stimulus evaluation, step initiation (reaction time), and step execution were determined and analyzed as a function of stimulus valence and stimulus-response mapping. The main result was that participants needed more time to initiate a forward step towards an angry face than towards a smiling face (which is evidence of a congruency effect), but with backward steps, this difference failed to reach significance. We also found a reduction in spontaneous body sway prior to the step with the incongruent mapping. The results provide a crucial empirical link between theories of socially induced action tendencies and theories of postural control and suggest a motoric basis for socially guided motivated behavior. © 2011 The Author(s).

    AB - Facial expressions are potent social cues that can induce behavioral dispositions, such as approach-avoidance tendencies. We studied these tendencies by asking participants to make whole-body forward (approach) or backward (avoidance) steps on a force plate in response to the valence of social cues (happy or angry faces) under affect-congruent and incongruent mappings. Posturographic parameters of the steps related to automatic stimulus evaluation, step initiation (reaction time), and step execution were determined and analyzed as a function of stimulus valence and stimulus-response mapping. The main result was that participants needed more time to initiate a forward step towards an angry face than towards a smiling face (which is evidence of a congruency effect), but with backward steps, this difference failed to reach significance. We also found a reduction in spontaneous body sway prior to the step with the incongruent mapping. The results provide a crucial empirical link between theories of socially induced action tendencies and theories of postural control and suggest a motoric basis for socially guided motivated behavior. © 2011 The Author(s).

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