Weak measurement invariance with respect to unmeasured variables: An implication of strict factorial invariance.

G.H. Lubke, C.V. Dolan, H. Kelderman, G.J. Mellenbergh

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Abstract

Measurement bias refers to systematic differences across subpopulations in the relation between observed test scores and the latent variant underlying the test scores. Comparisons of subpopulations with the same score on the latent variable can be expected to have the same observed test score. Measurement invariance is therefore one of the key issues in psychological testing. It has been established that strict factorial invariance (SFI) with respect to a selection variable V almost certainly implies weak measurement invariance with respect to V: given SFI, means and variances of observed scores do not depend on V. It is shown that this result can be extended. SFI in groups derived by selection on V has implications not only for V but also for potentially biasing variables W, if W and the selection variable V and/or if W and the factor underlying the observed test scores are statistically dependent. Given SFI with respect to V and prior knowledge concerning these dependencies, it is not necessary to measure and model variables W in order to exclude them as potentially biasing variables if the investigation focuses on groups selected on V.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)231-248
Number of pages19
JournalBritish Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology
Volume56
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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