Weight bearing exercise can elicit similar peak muscle activation as medium–high intensity resistance exercise in elderly women

Remco J. Baggen, Evelien van Roie, Jaap H. van Dieën, Sabine M. Verschueren, Christophe Delecluse

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To assess whether stepping-based weight bearing exercise (WBE) can elicit peak activation of upper leg muscles similar to resistance exercise (RE) at an intensity required to induce strength gains in elderly women. Methods: Muscular activation of several upper leg muscles was measured during RE and WBE in a cohort of 19 healthy elderly women (69.3 ± 3.4 years). WBE consisted of forward and lateral stepping with step heights of 10, 20 and 30 cm. Muscular activation was compared to 60% of one-repetition maximum (1-RM) of congruent RE. Results: Peak activation during WBE was higher than RE at 60% 1-RM during forward and lateral stepping in vastus lateralis starting at 20 cm (p = 0.049 and p = 0.001), and biceps femoris at 30 cm step height (p = 0.024 and p = 0.030). Gluteus maximus peak activation matched RE at 60% 1-RM at 20 and 30 cm step height regardless of step direction (p ≥ 0.077). Peak activation of the rectus femoris and gluteus medius matched RE activation at 60% 1-RM during lateral stepping at 30 cm (p = 0.355 and p = 0.243, respectively) but not during forward stepping. WBE did not induce similar activation as RE in the semitendinosus. Conclusion: In WBE, most upper leg muscles were recruited at an equal or higher intensity than in RE at 60% 1-RM. Lateral stepping at 30 cm step height showed the highest training potential of all WBE’s applied.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)531-541
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume118
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

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Weight-Bearing
Exercise
Muscles
Leg
Quadriceps Muscle

Keywords

  • Functional training
  • Sarcopenia
  • Stepping exercise
  • Surface EMG

Cite this

Baggen, Remco J. ; van Roie, Evelien ; van Dieën, Jaap H. ; Verschueren, Sabine M. ; Delecluse, Christophe. / Weight bearing exercise can elicit similar peak muscle activation as medium–high intensity resistance exercise in elderly women. In: European Journal of Applied Physiology. 2018 ; Vol. 118, No. 3. pp. 531-541.
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abstract = "Purpose: To assess whether stepping-based weight bearing exercise (WBE) can elicit peak activation of upper leg muscles similar to resistance exercise (RE) at an intensity required to induce strength gains in elderly women. Methods: Muscular activation of several upper leg muscles was measured during RE and WBE in a cohort of 19 healthy elderly women (69.3 ± 3.4 years). WBE consisted of forward and lateral stepping with step heights of 10, 20 and 30 cm. Muscular activation was compared to 60{\%} of one-repetition maximum (1-RM) of congruent RE. Results: Peak activation during WBE was higher than RE at 60{\%} 1-RM during forward and lateral stepping in vastus lateralis starting at 20 cm (p = 0.049 and p = 0.001), and biceps femoris at 30 cm step height (p = 0.024 and p = 0.030). Gluteus maximus peak activation matched RE at 60{\%} 1-RM at 20 and 30 cm step height regardless of step direction (p ≥ 0.077). Peak activation of the rectus femoris and gluteus medius matched RE activation at 60{\%} 1-RM during lateral stepping at 30 cm (p = 0.355 and p = 0.243, respectively) but not during forward stepping. WBE did not induce similar activation as RE in the semitendinosus. Conclusion: In WBE, most upper leg muscles were recruited at an equal or higher intensity than in RE at 60{\%} 1-RM. Lateral stepping at 30 cm step height showed the highest training potential of all WBE’s applied.",
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Weight bearing exercise can elicit similar peak muscle activation as medium–high intensity resistance exercise in elderly women. / Baggen, Remco J.; van Roie, Evelien; van Dieën, Jaap H.; Verschueren, Sabine M.; Delecluse, Christophe.

In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 118, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 531-541.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Weight bearing exercise can elicit similar peak muscle activation as medium–high intensity resistance exercise in elderly women

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AU - van Roie, Evelien

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AU - Delecluse, Christophe

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N2 - Purpose: To assess whether stepping-based weight bearing exercise (WBE) can elicit peak activation of upper leg muscles similar to resistance exercise (RE) at an intensity required to induce strength gains in elderly women. Methods: Muscular activation of several upper leg muscles was measured during RE and WBE in a cohort of 19 healthy elderly women (69.3 ± 3.4 years). WBE consisted of forward and lateral stepping with step heights of 10, 20 and 30 cm. Muscular activation was compared to 60% of one-repetition maximum (1-RM) of congruent RE. Results: Peak activation during WBE was higher than RE at 60% 1-RM during forward and lateral stepping in vastus lateralis starting at 20 cm (p = 0.049 and p = 0.001), and biceps femoris at 30 cm step height (p = 0.024 and p = 0.030). Gluteus maximus peak activation matched RE at 60% 1-RM at 20 and 30 cm step height regardless of step direction (p ≥ 0.077). Peak activation of the rectus femoris and gluteus medius matched RE activation at 60% 1-RM during lateral stepping at 30 cm (p = 0.355 and p = 0.243, respectively) but not during forward stepping. WBE did not induce similar activation as RE in the semitendinosus. Conclusion: In WBE, most upper leg muscles were recruited at an equal or higher intensity than in RE at 60% 1-RM. Lateral stepping at 30 cm step height showed the highest training potential of all WBE’s applied.

AB - Purpose: To assess whether stepping-based weight bearing exercise (WBE) can elicit peak activation of upper leg muscles similar to resistance exercise (RE) at an intensity required to induce strength gains in elderly women. Methods: Muscular activation of several upper leg muscles was measured during RE and WBE in a cohort of 19 healthy elderly women (69.3 ± 3.4 years). WBE consisted of forward and lateral stepping with step heights of 10, 20 and 30 cm. Muscular activation was compared to 60% of one-repetition maximum (1-RM) of congruent RE. Results: Peak activation during WBE was higher than RE at 60% 1-RM during forward and lateral stepping in vastus lateralis starting at 20 cm (p = 0.049 and p = 0.001), and biceps femoris at 30 cm step height (p = 0.024 and p = 0.030). Gluteus maximus peak activation matched RE at 60% 1-RM at 20 and 30 cm step height regardless of step direction (p ≥ 0.077). Peak activation of the rectus femoris and gluteus medius matched RE activation at 60% 1-RM during lateral stepping at 30 cm (p = 0.355 and p = 0.243, respectively) but not during forward stepping. WBE did not induce similar activation as RE in the semitendinosus. Conclusion: In WBE, most upper leg muscles were recruited at an equal or higher intensity than in RE at 60% 1-RM. Lateral stepping at 30 cm step height showed the highest training potential of all WBE’s applied.

KW - Functional training

KW - Sarcopenia

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