Wetland ecosystem services

Dolf de Groot, Luke Brander, C. Max Finlayson

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionaryAcademic

Abstract

Wetlands provide important and diverse benefits to people around the world, contributing provisioning, regulating, habitat, and cultural services. Critical regulating services include water-quality improvement, flood abatement and carbon management, while key habitat services are provided by wetland biodiversity. However, about half of global wetland areas have been lost, and the condition of remaining wetlands is declining. In New Zealand more than 90% of wetland area has been removed in the last 150 years, a loss rate among the highest in the world. New Zealand Maori greatly valued wetlands for their spiritual and cultural significance and as important sources of food and other materials closely linked to their identity. The remaining wetlands in New Zealand are under pressure from drainage, nutrient enrichment, invasive plants and animals, and encroachment from urban and agricultural development. In many countries, the degradation of wetlands and associated impairment of ecosystem services can lead to significant loss of human well-being and biodiversity, and negative long-term impacts on economies, communities, and business. Protection and restoration of wetlands are essential for future sustainability of the planet, providing safety nets for emerging issues such as global climate change, food production for an increasing world population, disturbance regulation, clean water, and the overall well-being of society.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Wetland Book
Subtitle of host publicationStructure and Function, Management, and Methods
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Chapter37
Pages323-333
Number of pages11
Volume1
ISBN (Electronic)9789048196593, 9789400761728
ISBN (Print)9789048134939
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 May 2018

Publication series

NameThe Wetland Book: I: Structure and Function, Management, and Methods

Fingerprint

Wetlands
Ecosystem
New Zealand
Biodiversity
Food
Urban Renewal
Planets
Climate Change
Water Quality
Quality Improvement
Agriculture
Drainage
Carbon
Safety
Pressure
Water

Keywords

  • Coastal wetlands
  • Concept
  • Description and examples
  • Economic valuation
  • Inland wetlands
  • Millennium ecosystem assessment
  • The economics of ecosystems and biodiversity
  • Wetland ecosystem services

Cite this

de Groot, D., Brander, L., & Max Finlayson, C. (2018). Wetland ecosystem services. In The Wetland Book: Structure and Function, Management, and Methods (Vol. 1, pp. 323-333). (The Wetland Book: I: Structure and Function, Management, and Methods). Springer Netherlands. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-90-481-9659-3_66, https://doi.org/10.1007%2F978-94-007-6172-8
de Groot, Dolf ; Brander, Luke ; Max Finlayson, C. / Wetland ecosystem services. The Wetland Book: Structure and Function, Management, and Methods. Vol. 1 Springer Netherlands, 2018. pp. 323-333 (The Wetland Book: I: Structure and Function, Management, and Methods).
@inbook{ef9377ead0b146f9af7292adcd4926f5,
title = "Wetland ecosystem services",
abstract = "Wetlands provide important and diverse benefits to people around the world, contributing provisioning, regulating, habitat, and cultural services. Critical regulating services include water-quality improvement, flood abatement and carbon management, while key habitat services are provided by wetland biodiversity. However, about half of global wetland areas have been lost, and the condition of remaining wetlands is declining. In New Zealand more than 90{\%} of wetland area has been removed in the last 150 years, a loss rate among the highest in the world. New Zealand Maori greatly valued wetlands for their spiritual and cultural significance and as important sources of food and other materials closely linked to their identity. The remaining wetlands in New Zealand are under pressure from drainage, nutrient enrichment, invasive plants and animals, and encroachment from urban and agricultural development. In many countries, the degradation of wetlands and associated impairment of ecosystem services can lead to significant loss of human well-being and biodiversity, and negative long-term impacts on economies, communities, and business. Protection and restoration of wetlands are essential for future sustainability of the planet, providing safety nets for emerging issues such as global climate change, food production for an increasing world population, disturbance regulation, clean water, and the overall well-being of society.",
keywords = "Coastal wetlands, Concept, Description and examples, Economic valuation, Inland wetlands, Millennium ecosystem assessment, The economics of ecosystems and biodiversity, Wetland ecosystem services",
author = "{de Groot}, Dolf and Luke Brander and {Max Finlayson}, C.",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1007/978-90-481-9659-3_66",
language = "English",
isbn = "9789048134939",
volume = "1",
series = "The Wetland Book: I: Structure and Function, Management, and Methods",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
pages = "323--333",
booktitle = "The Wetland Book",

}

de Groot, D, Brander, L & Max Finlayson, C 2018, Wetland ecosystem services. in The Wetland Book: Structure and Function, Management, and Methods. vol. 1, The Wetland Book: I: Structure and Function, Management, and Methods, Springer Netherlands, pp. 323-333. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-90-481-9659-3_66, https://doi.org/10.1007%2F978-94-007-6172-8

Wetland ecosystem services. / de Groot, Dolf; Brander, Luke; Max Finlayson, C.

The Wetland Book: Structure and Function, Management, and Methods. Vol. 1 Springer Netherlands, 2018. p. 323-333 (The Wetland Book: I: Structure and Function, Management, and Methods).

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionaryAcademic

TY - CHAP

T1 - Wetland ecosystem services

AU - de Groot, Dolf

AU - Brander, Luke

AU - Max Finlayson, C.

PY - 2018/5/16

Y1 - 2018/5/16

N2 - Wetlands provide important and diverse benefits to people around the world, contributing provisioning, regulating, habitat, and cultural services. Critical regulating services include water-quality improvement, flood abatement and carbon management, while key habitat services are provided by wetland biodiversity. However, about half of global wetland areas have been lost, and the condition of remaining wetlands is declining. In New Zealand more than 90% of wetland area has been removed in the last 150 years, a loss rate among the highest in the world. New Zealand Maori greatly valued wetlands for their spiritual and cultural significance and as important sources of food and other materials closely linked to their identity. The remaining wetlands in New Zealand are under pressure from drainage, nutrient enrichment, invasive plants and animals, and encroachment from urban and agricultural development. In many countries, the degradation of wetlands and associated impairment of ecosystem services can lead to significant loss of human well-being and biodiversity, and negative long-term impacts on economies, communities, and business. Protection and restoration of wetlands are essential for future sustainability of the planet, providing safety nets for emerging issues such as global climate change, food production for an increasing world population, disturbance regulation, clean water, and the overall well-being of society.

AB - Wetlands provide important and diverse benefits to people around the world, contributing provisioning, regulating, habitat, and cultural services. Critical regulating services include water-quality improvement, flood abatement and carbon management, while key habitat services are provided by wetland biodiversity. However, about half of global wetland areas have been lost, and the condition of remaining wetlands is declining. In New Zealand more than 90% of wetland area has been removed in the last 150 years, a loss rate among the highest in the world. New Zealand Maori greatly valued wetlands for their spiritual and cultural significance and as important sources of food and other materials closely linked to their identity. The remaining wetlands in New Zealand are under pressure from drainage, nutrient enrichment, invasive plants and animals, and encroachment from urban and agricultural development. In many countries, the degradation of wetlands and associated impairment of ecosystem services can lead to significant loss of human well-being and biodiversity, and negative long-term impacts on economies, communities, and business. Protection and restoration of wetlands are essential for future sustainability of the planet, providing safety nets for emerging issues such as global climate change, food production for an increasing world population, disturbance regulation, clean water, and the overall well-being of society.

KW - Coastal wetlands

KW - Concept

KW - Description and examples

KW - Economic valuation

KW - Inland wetlands

KW - Millennium ecosystem assessment

KW - The economics of ecosystems and biodiversity

KW - Wetland ecosystem services

UR - https://www.springer.com/us/book/9789048134939

U2 - 10.1007/978-90-481-9659-3_66

DO - 10.1007/978-90-481-9659-3_66

M3 - Entry for encyclopedia/dictionary

SN - 9789048134939

VL - 1

T3 - The Wetland Book: I: Structure and Function, Management, and Methods

SP - 323

EP - 333

BT - The Wetland Book

PB - Springer Netherlands

ER -

de Groot D, Brander L, Max Finlayson C. Wetland ecosystem services. In The Wetland Book: Structure and Function, Management, and Methods. Vol. 1. Springer Netherlands. 2018. p. 323-333. (The Wetland Book: I: Structure and Function, Management, and Methods). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-90-481-9659-3_66, https://doi.org/10.1007%2F978-94-007-6172-8